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Archive for the tag “Sports Management”

Springfield College

Springfield College (visited 5/29/19)

Springfield sign 3Want to be able to say that you attend school where basketball was invented? Want to join a hammock club? Maybe ride for a club equestrian team? Springfield College could be the place for you.

I fell in love with this place! This was another school that I knew almost nothing about, but I walked away wanting to recommend it to several students. There are a couple things in particular that I think made it stand out:

  • Springfield waterThey own a 57-acre Outdoor Learning Center, technically called East Campus, located on the shores of a lake a couple miles from man campus.
    • There are bike trails, ropes courses, disc golf, and authentic SW pueblos which serves as a space for overnight retreats. They hold an optional pre-orientation program for incoming freshmen as well as camps for younger students. “We call it Challenge by Choice,” said the rep. “No one is going to force you to do things, but if you want to be challenged in this way, it’s here.”
    • Springfield bell towerThe tour guide said that the OLC is her favorite place. “The memories you make are so special. Running to find a blue racquetball because a whistle blew or kazooing your heart out for no other reason than just because you can is great.”
    • They offer a class called Outdoor Pursuits which is required by several majors, but it’s open to anyone interested in enrolling in it. The Recreation Management major and Adventure Education minor use this location extensively.
  • Springfield statue 1They have an active YMCA club and offer a minor in YMCA Professional Studies. I’ve never heard of another program like that – but the college was founded as a YMCA training center, so this isn’t entirely surprising. Students are heavily involved in tutoring, and last year there was a service trip to Peru.
  • “Springfield provides a really good safe zone system with required training. There’s real multicultural education here. I learned about disability acts, LGBTQ issues, financial equity classes. There’s a lot in place to make people feel included and safe.”

Springfield humanicsSpringfield’s mission is “Educating Spirit, Mind, and Body in Service for Others.” This comes across as similar to the Jesuit Mission, but Springfield is totally non-affiliated with any religious group. Rather, they model this after the Greek Humanics ideals that balance is important. Students not only know what the mission is, but they seem to have bought into it. It is embedded into the culture and the curriculum. Students buy into a seriousness of purpose when it comes to academics and decorum but also how to have fun. “We don’t cut corners in life so we don’t cut corners on campus. Students will literally yell ‘Grasshole’ to students who cut across the grass just to get somewhere more quickly,” said my tour guide. “People will absolutely go on the quad for recreation – you’ll see people playing Frisbee and hanging out. They just don’t walk on the grass to get somewhere more quickly.”

Springfield 4When I arrived on campus, the admission rep and I had lunch in the dining hall while we talked about the college. Choices were limited because it was summertime, but they had absolutely amazing chicken marsala, rice pilaf, and fresh vegetables (in addition to burgers and a sandwich bar). I was really impressed. The tour guide said that she’d rate food about a 7-8 (I would’ve said higher based on what was served that day), but “weekend food is a 5 mostly because there are fewer options.”

“There are so many leadership opportunities and support and training for that. You don’t have to be a Type-A person, but if you want to make a difference and develop skills and implement them, this is a great place. There are so many people here who will help you do what you’re passionate about.” They have more extensive academic offerings than I expected for a campus this size (just about 2,500 undergrads).

  • Springfield learning commons

    The Learning Commons: the 4th floor has a study lounge that overlooks the athletic fields. “It’s a great place to get work done while you watch games,” said the tour guide. She also said that the furniture was chosen by students.

    This is a good place for athletes and majors that revolve around that (Sports Biology, Sports Management, Sports Journalism, etc)

    • There is a massive athletic center (bigger than any I’ve seen outside huge DI institutions) with classrooms (especially for Athletic Training and Movement and Sports Studies/PhysEd majors and their coaching minor), Dance Studios (they have both a major and a minor, and Dance teams perform at halftime during football games).
  • PT, AT, OT, and PA are direct entry programs but are capped.
  • Education is big. Students are in the schools starting their first semester.
  • They have some visual and performing arts, but seem to offer more minors than majors in this area, including 3D animation, Web Design, Creative Writing, and Community Arts.
  • Internships are required and transportation can be found. “You can totally explore what you’re interested in.”

Springfield 6Freshmen are not allowed to have cars on campus, but there are shuttles around town on the weekends. There are also a lot of bus trips to Boston, NYC, Albany, and other places. There is a 3 year on-campus residency requirement, but 85% of all student live on campus. The senior dorms (townhouses and suites) are on the far side of the football field so they get great views of the games. The tour guide said that given the opportunity, she would put money into scholarships or to improve the bathrooms in some of the dorms. She also said that they can improve the number of People of Color on campus, but think that’s something that is being worked on.

© 2019

Western New England University

Western New England University (visited 5/29/19)

WNEU fountain“I chose to come here because people here looked happy. Everyone at the other school I was considering looked stressed out. I definitely made the right choice.”

I feel very confident recommending WNEU to students. I love walking away from a college with that feeling, particularly when I knew almost nothing about it to start. First, I love that WNEU made their campus easy to navigate – and particularly that their Welcome Center was so easy to find.

WNEU 2More importantly, I love that WNEU is able to differentiate themselves from their competitors. Because of this, enrollment has been going up despite the declining demographics. I spent over an hour talking to the Dean of Admission: “I love where we’re going. It’s so different from when I was in school. We’re looking to add majors and programs. The only true competition we have in the area is UMass.”

WNEU 9

The Library entrance

It’s no secret that universities face a lot of competition, particularly in the Northeast. Because there are so many institutions to choose from, WNEU has deliberately differentiated themselves. “We tend to sent trends. We get things going, and within a couple years, it seems like other places are starting to pick up on what we’re doing, but that just helps us to keep thinking outside the box.” One way they do this is by the working between the colleges:

  • WNEU sci bldg int

    The atrium of one of the science buildings

    They are one of the few schools this size to have a Law School on campus. They use this to their advantage.

    • They’ve created a BS/JD Engineering and Law program for people who want to go into patent law. “This is a really rigorous program and usually only a few students will do this in any given year.”
    • They offer a 3+3 accelerated law Students essentially finish their major/core requirements in the first 3 years and “save the electives for senior year. The first year of law school basically fills those electives, and then they get the Bachelors degree.”
  • Business:
    • WNEU solar house

      A solar house built by students; they took this to a national competition in California

      Ohio University was the pioneer of the Sports Management, but WNEU has the only other one with double accreditation. “Don’t come here for Kinesiology. Come here for the business side.” They’ve been ranked #1 in this department.

    • They have a strong programs in Arts and Entertainment Management, Sport Leadership and Coaching, and Pharmaceutical Business.
    • Accounting is ranked #2 for recruitment of students by major companies out of Hartford (only UConn beat them and they’re 4 times bigger).
    • They are 1 of only 7 schools offering classes in SAP and the only one to offer its students a chance to gain certification. Students with this often get a $6,000-8000 bump in salary. They also offer SAS certification in Business Analytics. Market Analytics is also getting big, especially for non-profits.
  • WNEU lab 2

    One of the labs

    Engineering puts students into labs immediately as freshman, they complete group projects every year, and every student gets a paid internship before graduation. The university has good relationships with United Technology, Smith & Wesson, and many more. Some freshmen even get internships because the program is so strong, but they can’t earn credit until junior year.

  • WNEU Sci and PharmHealth Sciences has almost doubled in size in the last couple years. It’s their version of pre-med.
    • Pre-Optometry and Pre-Physician Assistant are 4-year tracks that aren’t capped.
    • Pharmacy is a 6-year program (2 in pre-pharm, 4 in pharm). They only take 65 students into the program each year, and the SATs are required. If they’re accepted, it’s early-assurance. If they earn a 3.3 GPA in the first 3 semesters with no grades lower than a C-, they’re guaranteed a seat without the need for rec letters or tests. “This helps the students know that it’s really what they want so they can change their mind and still transfer credits into another major. It also helps the school by not having them transfer out of the professional program.”
  • WNEU psych classes

    A poster helping students navigate the multitude of options within the psychology department

    In the Arts & Sciences, Criminal Justice and Psych are the biggest majors.

    • CJ offers concentrations such as Homeland Security and Terrorism, Victim Studies, Criminal Investigations (like the forensics w/o the science), legal studies.
    • Psych: offers both BA or BS (more research oriented) with more than 15 tracks (not a concentration) such as clinical, sports, forensics, environmental psych, and industrial/organizational.
    • Forensic Bio and Forensic Chem are also popular.

WNEU 6I love that they offer so many accelerated, direct-entry, and 4+1 programs. “Anything we can do to help out the student and maybe save them a bit of money is beneficial.”

It’s amazing how deliberate they are in helping students find the right fit, even if that isn’t WNEU. “The resources and the opportunities make it the right fit. I’d rather lose kids who don’t want to be here than try to convince them to come and then lose them. That doesn’t help anyone. If we can’t support you, if we don’t have the major you want, then I’m going to tell a student to look at another school.” This plays a huge role in retention.

WNEU 10Another way they help prospective students is to tell them where they stand if they bring a transcript and test scores to their visit. Many programs (particularly business and Arts & Sciences are test-optional). “We can let them know if sending in test scores is a good idea or not in these cases when we look over stuff.”

“We’d rather take the B/B+ students who work hard and have been involved in school life because they’re the ones who will take advantage of more opportunities. The 4.0 kids are often more focused on the books. The others are looking to get involved and do really well here. We’ll have the kids who struggled or didn’t want to come here to give tours. They’re the best ambassadors we have.”

WNEU cupola 2One of the perceived drawbacks of the college is the location, “but this is NOT the same city it was 20 years ago. It’s no longer on the Dangerous City List,” said the rep. Springfield is the 3rd largest city in Massachuetts and the city of Firsts (Basketball, Goodyear tires, and the Webster dictionary to name a few). The casino has come in, people have moved up from Hartford, and there’s quite a bit of revitalization. There are resources available for students, not just in the city but the region.

WNEU mascot 2

The Mascot statue which students ride

Campus is also booming. They have clubs for transfers, vets, and commuters so they look out for all sorts of students. One of the most popular “and one of the most welcoming clubs I’ve ever seen” is Warp, a gaming club. They’re looking into adding E-Sports, potentially starting it as a club. There are a number of popular traditions, including:

  • Students are supposed to ride the Bear statue (the mascot) before they graduate
  • Painting the rock to advertise something
  • Midnight Madness – intro to winter sports
  • Bear Olympics: this part of transitions program in the first 3 weeks. Every dorm and a Commuter Team all compete. I think it’s great that they include commuters in this; they often get left out of dorm competitions.

Sports are also popular, both to play and for students to go watch. They’re starting a Women’s Ice Hockey team in 2020 (this may help balance out the gender imbalance – they’re currently at 60% male which makes sense because of their engineering programs). The rep would love to see an ice hockey rink built on campus. “We’re losing talented players because other places have the rink.” He’d also love to build up the arts a bit more. They have an established theater program but no black box. He’d love to combine Sports Management and Business Analytics. Some Masters programs could be added and increase the offerings – but this just links back to WNEU being on the cutting edge. Everyone is thinking about the next thing there.

© 2019

Averett University

Averett University (visited 11/2011)

I had never heard of Averett before visiting as part of a counselor tour. This is a well-maintained campus that serves students well. Students were everywhere around campus and interacting with each other; people seemed genuinely happy to be part of campus. Although there are fewer than 900 undergraduates, the campus feels busier, in large part because of the non-traditional and graduate programs. Students who want small discussion-based classes and a hands-on education will do well here. They combine the liberal arts with strong programs. It’s truly a hidden gem, and I wish more people knew about it.

Most unusual for a Liberal Arts school, particularly of this size, is their Aeronautics program, which includes an FAA-approved flight school. Their direct-entry Nursing program and the Medical Technology program are both noteworthy, as are the Equestrian, Sports Management/Physical Education, and Biomedical programs.

This is one of the few schools I’ve encountered that had severed ties with its founding church (in this case, Baptist) and then reestablished it. However, there’s little about the college that indicates that there are any ties at all. It does not permeate the culture on campus. Students who want a strong religious culture would probably not be as happy here as on some other campuses, but for those who are interested in having something around if they want it will find what they’re looking for

Danville is a small city of about 45,000 people in southern Virginia near the NC border. There is enough to do in town when students want to get off campus, and there’s an Amtrak station in town allowing for relatively easy access to Charlotte, NC and Washington, DC when students are looking for a larger city. Things are walkable, but there’s also plenty to do on campus. Students said that they didn’t feel the need to get off on a regular basis, but did appreciate the availability of other options.

Dr. Tiffany Franks, the President, is welcoming and engaging. She opened her home to the group of counselors visiting the college; she does this regularly for students, as well. She clearly cares about the success of the students and has done wonders for the college.

© 2016

Neumann University

Neumann University (visited 7/22/16)

Neumann domeNeumann has come a long way since its opening in 1965. Founded in the Franciscan Tradition, “it’s a very loving place,” said one admissions rep. “We’re interested in admitting people who we’ll be able to assist in meeting their goals. Neumann is going to take care of you. If you’re struggling, we’ll find you and help you through.”

Franciscan Sisters still live on campus and are highly involved in the school. Although about half of the undergraduates identify as Catholic, they have a number of different religions on campus. There’s also a great deal of racial and other diversity. Almost ¼ of the population is African-American, and many others identify as multi-racial.

Neumann garden

A garden on campus

This is a nicely landscaped campus with what we dubbed “pocket gardens,” small areas around campus with a couple benches and trees/bushes/flowers.

Neumann dorm

One of the dorms

This had been primarily a commuter school, but this is changing. The current on-campus population hovers around 50%; they are actively trying to move that to 60%. They have room for 900 students, but usually only 7-800 live on campus at this point. They’re building “intentional communities” within the dorms such as floors in the halls for the Honors program and other LLCs. They’re zoned for triples but most are doubles right now; students choosing to have a triple can pay less. Housing is guaranteed for all 4 years. The great thing is that all dorm rooms have their own bathrooms!

Neumann 1The tour guide has been impressed that the school listens to students and are changing the culture to holistic living and learning allowing students to learn to manage their lives properly, become adults, etc. For example, the alcohol policies have started to change; this had been a dry campus, but alcohol is now allowed in the apartments (generally only occupied by seniors and therefore of legal age).

Neumann tv studio

One of the tv studios

Nursing is the biggest major, and they prepare students well: they have an impressive 93-94% NCLEX pass rate (3-year average). They are somewhat more flexible with admissions into the program because they’re willing to have students try if they want to, but they do have a bit higher attrition than peer institutions. Students realize they don’t like it and/or that they aren’t doing well and self-select or are counseled out.

Other programs worth mentioning are:

Neumann plaza 2Located within 30 minutes of Philly and just north of Wilmington, DE, Neumann maintains 170 active internship sites NOT including education or health science clinical experiences, allowing students to graduate with hands-on experience.

Neumann is a big hockey school, including roller hockey as a club sport. They’re a DIII school playing in the Colonial States Conference. They’re adding Men’s Volleyball and women’s swimming this year.

© 2016

Flagler College

Flagler College (visited 2/12/16)

Flagler studentsOne thing that makes Flager stand out is that they’re rooted heavily in the liberal arts: there’s no engineering, no math major (yet; they have a minor), and no science departments – with the notable exception of their new Coastal Environmental Science program, now one of their biggest departments.

Coastal Environmental Science is the hardest major to get into. The difference between this and general Envi Sci is that “this is specific to the Coast. We don’t do volcanoes or tundras or mountains. Go to App State if you want the mountains. The coast is where most of the stress is; it’s where most of the population of the world lives; it’s where most of the job opportunities are. The job prospects are never going away.”

Flagler walkwayCurrently there are only 2 labs “and they’re pretty standard on purpose. The program is designed around our location. A lot of the teaching is done outside.” Students spend time in and around the water, including a nearby lighthouse where students can stay overnight. They don’t teach organic chemistry but they do aquatic and other specialized chemistry (one professor specializes in bio-geo-chemistry): “We do have students who go off to med school from here; they just need to plan ahead and do a couple summer courses somewhere else.”

Flagler 6A few other strong or unusual majors are:

“It’s not enough to have a college degree; you need to be able to show what you’ve done and talk about what you want to do with it.” All majors and minors require a capstone experience of some sort whether is research, an internship, or something else. Overall, 71% of students completed an experiential learning opportunity. Currently, some students are working on “Fish Communities and effects of plastic on the environment.” This hasn’t been done before and is going to end up in a publication for the students.

Flagler 4When asked, “Who Is a Flagler Kid?” we were told this: they look for “an academic kid who wants to be involved, wants smaller class sizes, and who appreciates where we’re located” (historic city, historic building). They do a great job with the B/middle-of-the-road kid who comes in liking 2 or 3 things and are willing to take some time to try them out. They should be somewhat self-motivated to look for internships, etc. There’s help and resources, but no one is going to force them to use them. Students should be invested in themselves.

Flagler Edison towerFlagler has no Greek Life but there are honor societies. There are about 55 student clubs including a Surf club, Deaf Awareness, creative writing, religious groups (Christian, Jewish, general religion), and political groups. Students agree that there’s a good split of politics on campus, but “people get along. There’s lots of discussion. “

Flagler male dorm

One of the male dorms

 

The average GPA hovers around a 3.5 with 1050 SAT or 23 ACT. International students need a TOEFL of 75. The exceptions to this are students applying to the Education and Coastal Envi Sci departments. Just over half of the 2,500 undergraduates come from Florida. The 40% out-of-state domestic students come from all over with the NY, NJ, MD, VA, and GA being the next most represented states. Just over 5% of the population is international from 43 foreign countries. They are actively trying to increase racial diversity on campus. They offer an additional scholarship to students “if they’re diverse in any way.”

Flagler 4

The Flagler Hotel – now a main building on campus with the dining hall and women’s dorm

The cost also makes Flagler stand out: at their current rate of $26,500 per YEAR (tuition, R&B), they run about 50% of the national cost of a liberal arts school. Most students receive financial aid, but “you aren’t going to see huge scholarships because our costs are already so much cheaper than other places.” The top merit scholarship is about $3,000.

Flagler female dorm

Hallway in the women’s dorm

There is a first-year residency requirement. Females are housed in the historic hotel originally owned by Henry Flagler. Each room is different and houses anywhere from 2-5 girls. As a trade-off, each room has its own bathroom (no shared baths in the building) and the dining hall is downstairs. Most freshmen males are housed across the street in a large building with all doors opening to the outside; most of these are suites so they share 1 bathroom between 2 rooms. Several athletes are housed closer to the athletic fields. Coed visitation is not allowed at any time; we were surprised by this since this has never been a religiously affiliated school. It’s also a dry campus, and they have a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to drugs.

Flagler dining hall

The dining hall with Tiffany windows

The main campus is contained within a 2-block area with a few exceptions. The new communications building is about a block away among city buildings, and the athletic fields are a mile or so off campus. On campus, the old Flagler Hotel dominates the scene; outside is beautiful outdoor area for student to congregate, socialize, and work. There are plenty of shaded seating areas and trees with plugs everywhere so students can stay connected. The art building next door is only open to art students who have to swipe their cards to get in. The dining hall has the largest collection of Tiffany stained glass. The library is very light and airy. The Edison Smoke Stack provided electricity to the hotel and campus 3 years before the White House got electricity.

Flagler comm bldg

The Communications Department tucked among houses on a side street off campus

We asked the students on the panel about their favorite classes and why they liked them:

  • Sign Language. All the teachers are deaf so it was intense was first. I took my first class here and knew nothing. We had an interpreter at first but then were on our own.
  • Political Leaders of the 20th Century: it was my professor, 1 other student, and myself. We would read what we were interested in and discussed for 45 minutes.
  • My internship with the Sheriff’s office. It’s not a classroom environment.
  • Criminal Behavior: the professor was amazing. We got to do a lot of profiling.

What do you love?

  • The First Year experience has been really important. Orientation was good; we had something every day and every night. Showing up at class a week later, I knew people.
  • The professors. You get to have the same ones several times, and they help us with internships. I can go to office hours for whatever. I had coffee the other day with one of them and just chatted.
  • I came here undecided. Taking smaller discussion-based classes were helpful. I was a good student in high school but not great. Being put into these classes helped me find what I really was interested in.
  • I thought I knew why I loved it until I took a class called Oral Histories. Now I’m interviewing alumni from the 60s and 70s about how it’s changed. I didn’t know how many alumni worked here. I love that!
Flagler plaza 3

The hotel courtyard

What would you like changed or improved?

  • Have some sort of building for a community center. I’d like to involve the town and the university. We should be working together and have events together.
  • We’re in a historical district, so it’s hard to get more parking. It’s an issue.
  • Add a science building with more labs, including a sterile lab.
  • Build a residence hall with a full kitchen. I like to cook!
  • Add a math department! Maybe it’ll also draw more males.
  • Have school shuttles to stores and other places (including airports) that are just for students.

© 2016

Keiser University

Keiser University (visited 2/7/16)

Keiser mascotKeiser is in the midst of a massive overhaul and should continue transforming dramatically over the next several years. Until last year, this had been Northwood College, owned and operated as a satellite campus of the parent university in Michigan. Now, the university in its entirety has been bought by Keiser which runs programs all over Florida. This will be their traditional, 4-year, residential campus.

Keiser st cntrThis small campus is Keiser’s flagship and only residential campus. As part of the buy-out agreement, all current students can continue with their Northwood programs. Some of these will phase out as the current students finish, some will continue, and many programs will be added. Most of the Northwood students stayed, and the current seniors, assuming they finish their degree requirements by the end of the school year, will receive Northwood diplomas. All others will receive Keiser diplomas.

They licensed all the programs for 4 years so it’s a seamless transition. In addition to those programs, they’re picking up all of Keiser’s health care and liberal arts programs. There was also very little faculty turnover; 2 retired, a couple others left. They did hire more so they have more working here than before.

Keiser dorm courtyard 2

The dorms and courtyard.

“Students First” is the recurring theme. President Tom Duncan (a PhD in PoliSci and an Anglican Priest from the Ozarks) welcomed us as we arrived, shaking everyone’s hand and chatting. In his opening remarks, he said, “I suspect that we’re not going forward as a liberal arts program but more comprehensive with business and health care, maybe computer science. It’ll be a little more practical, more hands-on.” He’s very proud that the accreditation team visited and found nothing wrong (although without a health or counseling center on campus – according to the admissions rep I spoke to – I’m not sure how that’s possible. I hope this is one of the areas they work on quickly).

Keiser 2Students seem to come here for the sports or for very specific academic programs. The panel of students we spoke to included:

  • A sophomore from the Bahamas, majoring in Finance and Econ. He was looking for good academics, a positive atmosphere, and the ability to connect to professors. He said he was surprised at how friendly people were: “I had an image from American movies, but people so nice here!” It’s why he stays.
  • A senior from Columbia, majoring in Int’l business and finance. She likes the small classrooms and personal connections. “We’re surrounded by people we know and we’re familiar with.” He started playing baseball but got injured.
  • A Marketing and Advertising Major came here because of her passion for business. “There are lots of volunteering opportunities and options to join clubs.”
  • A sophomore Canadian student is enrolled in the Automotive Marketing and Management program. “It’s a pretty specific program. Not many schools offer it.”
  • A student from Texas transferred from a school in Iowa. She plays volleyball here. “We live in paradise!”

Their athletic program is particularly strong; their 17 DII teams (19 next year with the addition of lacrosse and swimming) play in the NAIA against schools like SCAD and Johnson & Wales. Women’s golf won last year and are currently #1 ranked. (As a side note: golfers have a GPA of 3.92). They offer $1,000 athletic scholarships.

Keiser bell tower 5Driving into campus felt like a wilderness preserve. They own 100 acres, most of which is not currently being used. They’ve received a level 6 accreditation which means they can offer doctoral programs, and they plans for expansion and new buildings. Enrollment is currently 600 full-time undergrads with a goal for 1000 within 3 years. They’re approved for 1800 students, but would ultimately like to go beyond that. Application numbers are soaring with 2.5 times as many applications as this time last year. Students need a minimum of 2.75 GPA and a 16 ACT or 880 SAT to get in. About 1/3 of the students are international; the TOEFL or SAT/ACT is needed when their high school instruction wasn’t in English. Keiser offers good merit scholarships, also available to international students.

Health Care programs are strong. They offer programs such as BioMedical Technology (also counts as their Pre-Med program), Dietetics and Nutrition, and Imaging Sciences. They’ve just been approved to offer a BSN this fall. They’ll pull in 2 cohorts a year (1 each semester) with 24 students per cohort. Eventually, this campus will offer every 4-year health program that Keiser offers. Currently, they don’t have labs built, but they should be open by the fall of 2016.

The Sports Medicine & Fitness Technology programs looks for motivated, disciplined, people who want to help others. “Students in this program are a mix of brains and brawn. They usually embrace a health lifestyle, and perhaps want to pursue a career in PT, Chiropractics, or OT.”

Sports Management is a BS or a BBA degree: students hit the ground running when they get here, and almost half get weeded out: “They realize they want to have fun, but this really is a business. This isn’t what they pictured it to be.” They give students a combination of sports management AND business to appeal to both types of employers. About 2/3 of students get a job in the field upon graduation, higher than the 50% national average, and they’re also well prepared for grad or law school through an internship and a practicum. They get jobs in professional and college sports, Sport tourism, Facility management, Adventure sports, Sports Agent, or sport lawyers.

Keiser golf school 3In the College of Golf Management students become teachers, go into the Hospitality industry, design clubs or golf courses, etc. Right now, this is an AA degree, and students usually continue on to do a BS in Sports Management. They have a very high placement rate for students in this program. They have 3 PGA professionals on staff.

We asked the student panelists about their favorite class:

  • Entrepreneurship: “I always loved it. I spoke to the teacher and he invited me to a class and that extended to the whole semester. I love verbal communication and he spoke right to us. No PowerPoints or anything. Being able to sit in on a class I didn’t even have to register for was great.”
  • Capital Investments: “It gave me knowledge I could apply to my internships.”
  • Principles of Advertising. “It teaches you a little psychology and how to sell. It’s really interesting! I want to be involved in all aspects of my business.”
  • Italian: “I like learning languages.”
  • Current trends in Advertising. “There were only 5 students. We bring in articles and talk about what’s new. Next week’s project will be the Super Bowl commercials.”

© 2016

Cazenovia College

Cazenovia College (visited 7/24/15)

~Caz quad 2I was surprised at how compact campus was. The main part of campus is encompassed by the equivalent of a large city block with several buildings across the streets along the perimeter. The main street of Cazenovia is literally a block away from the main campus, and Cazenovia Lake is a short 4-block walk away.

~Caz bell“If you want to know a lot of people and been known by a lot of people, this is the place for you,” said the admissions representative.

~Caz studentEven in the summer, students were populating the main quad on campus, sunbathing, talking in groups, and sitting at picnic tables. Almost 90% of students live on campus. Most students stay on campus until senior year, at which point, they do have the option of moving off “but moving off could affect scholarships and Financial Aid, so most elect to stay,” said the rep. There are some scholarship that come with residential requirements, but some students will elect to take a lower-level scholarship that will enable them to move off.

~Caz 4Cazenovia is located about 20 miles from downtown Syracuse in the small town of Cazenovia. They’re squarely in the middle of “Equine Alley,” as one of the students put it. There are lots of horse (and other types of) farms, and students can major in Equine Business Management. Other business tracks include Accounting, Fashion Merchandising, Health Care Management, Management, and Sports Management. The students in the Sports track worked at the Super Bowl last year doing event management!

~Caz 2Other strong and popular programs are:

~Caz flowersStudents who thrive here are those who want a solid Liberal Arts education with hands-on, practical experience. “B students are going to be fine here. If you’re a B-/C student . . . dazzle me with your essay,” said the admissions rep.

© 2015

College of Saint Joseph

College of St. Joseph (visited 4/16/14)

St. Joe's missionThis is the first tour I’ve ever taken during which the Director of Food Services talked to the group (she came out as we were eating breakfast). She has been here for 8 years, and not only works in the dining hall, but also teaches Kick Boxing to the kids. She really gets to know them; “I know when something isn’t right. I know their names, and within a couple months, I know their footsteps as they pass by my office.”

St. Joe's Acad BldgThis small school of 350 students sits on 117 acres in the small city of Rutland, Vermont. They’re starting to transfer some of that land so they can grow their own food which will be served in the dining hall. The food is all homemade; “if something doesn’t taste like mom’s food, bring me mom’s recipe. We’ll make it.”

Dorm

Dorm

The campus is so small that the tour only took about 20 minutes. They currently have two single-sex dorms, but are looking to increase the residential population by 30% so the dorms may become coed by next year. The dorm we went into looks like a motel with doors leading right outside, but the suites are lovely. The common room even comes with a TV! Students who opt for a single room pay a $500 per semester surcharge.

St. Joe's statueOne tour guide said that the Catholic tradition was “historical rather than practical, but we’re looking to reactive that tradition.” Another one basically said “It’s a Catholic institution. We’re not actively looking for other students.” Despite the level of affiliation with the Catholic Church, they do institute the core values of Sisters of St. Joseph which include a commitment to hospitality and concern for people around them; part of their mission is to reach out to others. They run a wonderful program called STEPs (Students Taking an Effective Path to Success) to support students from the Vermont Foster Care system. They accept 5-7 students under this program each year and support them through the college years, including full room and board year-round, including breaks. Students in this program graduate at almost ten times the national average. They also enroll a high percentage of first-gen students, and almost 90% are Pell Eligible. They really live up to what they said about admitting their freshmen class: “It’s not about your SAT score. It’s about who you want to be when you exit.”

St. Joe's Acad Bldg 2Starting next fall, they’re moving to a four-day schedule with no classes on Wednesday which will be Community Day. There will be time set aside for the Freshman Experience, for spiritual reflection, for work in the community, and for tutoring or extra help/meeting time with faculty.

They’re just wrapping up their first year of the Provider Scholarship Program which provides a scholarship in exchange for service to the school and community. Students have to be intellectually curious, participate in a campus activity of their choosing (could be a club, sport, etc), complete 15 hours of community service hours per semester (usually with a local company), and attend a career workshop. There’s a declining cost structure; students get an increase in scholarship money each year as long as they continue to meet the requirements. The Director of Admissions partially credits their rising retention rate to this (75% return for sophomore year compared to 49% a few years ago).

They have a limited number of majors due to their small size, but they do offer a couple unusual options including Radiography, Organizational Leadership, and Sports Management. Students in the Business program can complete a concentration in Social Media. Classes are small, and even the introductory levels usually only have 13-20 students. Upper levels often have 5 or 6. Because there are so few students, they can be placed in meaningful internships.

© 2014

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