campus encounters

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Archive for the tag “Social Work”

Virginia Commonwealth University

Virginia Commonwealth University (visited 3/13/17)

VCU 1

One of the dorms; much of campus sits on streets like this

Students looking for an urban campus with lots of diversity, school spirit, and big sports will do well here. However, they need to be willing to advocate for themselves.

This is a state school with 24,000 undergrads, 37% of whom are male and 89% coming from in-state. Gen Ed classes run 150-200 students in lecture halls, but the upper level major classes average 27 students. “It’s the students’ job to take advantage of the opportunities.” Classes are varied, as you’d expect from a school this size. A couple favorite classes were Cultural Text and Context about Egypt and Women in Global Politics.

VCU ped walkway

The pedestrian walkway part of central campus

Campus sits in the middle of Richmond with almost no “central campus” in the traditional sense. However, location means there’s plenty to do, and students have opportunities to connect to the community, get internships, and apply what they’ve learned. The James River is minutes away from campus with hiking and other activities. Richmond itself is centrally located, only 1.5 hours to Virginia Beach and a little more than 2 hours to DC.

VCU 2

One of the older buildings on campus

VCU is a relatively new institution, starting in 1968 when 2 colleges merged. The main campus sits on the site of one school; all the medical programs (including graduate schools) are on the other one a couple miles away. The do offer a Guaranteed Admissions Program for some honors students into several of the graduate health programs as long as they meet the minimum requirements. This is not binding so it’s ok if they change their mind. Applications for this have a hard November 15 deadline; students need a 1330 SAT or 29 ACT and a 3.5 unweighted GPA. Beyond that, they should have done something to stand out such as shadowing or volunteering.

Engineering and the Arts are big here:

  • Engineering has offerings in Biomedical, Chemical and Life Science, Electrical and Computer, and Mechanical and Nuclear.
  • VCU arts 1

    One of the art studios

    The Arts Department includes both visual ad performing arts.

    • Visual arts are very much studio-based. “It allows us to establish ourselves and experiment,” said a junior painting/printmaking major from Kansas. “I wanted to go somewhere where I had the resources of an entire university.” He loves the program and is very happy with his decision to come to VCU, but said the downfall is that they don’t get any help in establishing a design portfolio. “We’re on our own to figure that out.” There also aren’t really any internships easily available or at least advertised. “I looked online; I think this major is the only one with nothing listed for internship opportunities,” he told me.
    • Unusual offerings include Kinetic Imaging and Craft and Material Studies.
VCU plaza

The plaza outside the main dining commons (to the left). The library is the glass building on the right.

Humanities and Sciences, of course, is the biggest school. A few unusual offerings are Military Science and Leadership, Statistical Sciences and Operations Research, Kinesiology, and Forensic Science.

The smallest majors/schools are Social Work (35 freshman) and Life Sciences with 51 freshmen (this includes Bioinformatics, Envi Sci, and Integrative Life Sciences; biology and other sciences are in the Arts and Sciences division).

Students really like the diversity on campus. “Campus shows off the spectrum of people there. I’ve made friends from all over,” said one of the tour guides (we had 3).

VCU LLC 1

An LLC building

There are plenty of living opportunities such as LLCs and Global Living. There is no residency requirement, but 74% of freshmen do live on campus. Food gets good reviews from the students: “There’s so much food! They keep adding new options every year.” The dining hall sometimes runs what they call ‘Upper Cuts’ which serves “really, really great food!” according to one of the tour guides. It requires a second swipe on the meal plan. Restaurant Row, on one of the main streets running through campus, takes Rams Bucks. For students living off campus, it’s easy to find apartments and houses to rent near campus.

VCU dormAdmissions is rolling, and it takes about 4-6 weeks to get a decision after application is complete. They recommend that students include their SSN on the app to facilitate the link to FAFSA. This streamlines, the process, reduces mistakes, and allows them to get the package to students earlier. Students applying by Jan 15 will get an answer by April 1 at the latest. Test scores are optional for students with a 3.3 GPA at the time of application BUT are required for merit scholarships, the Honors College, Engineering majors, and for homeschooled applicants. If you want to get considered for automatic-consideration scholarships – apply by 11/15!!!

VCU stu cntrThe Honors College will look at writing on standardized tests; regular admissions does not. Priority deadline for freshman Honors Program is 2/1. The Guaranteed Admissions program falls under the honors college: if you’re admitted to GA, you’re admitted to HC, but not vice versa! The application for GA is on the Honors College website and is completely separate from the Common App.

© 2017

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Cabrini University

Cabrini University (visited 7/21/16)

Cabrini 1Cabrini is a hidden gem of a school that I hope more people will look at. It has a lot to offer! The student panelists were impressive, articulate, and gave great answers to the “Why Cabrini?” question instead of just “It feels like home!” They talked about the honors program, club offerings, quality of their academic programs, the ability to play sports which wouldn’t have been possible at a larger school, the size, and being able to get involved. Students agreed that this is a transformative experience: One panelist said, “I was a quiet average kid in high school. I didn’t do anything special or get involved. I’ve opened up more and became more independent. I say yes to trying things. It’s presented challenges but also made me stronger academically.”

Cabrini statueWe drove up a wooded lane to get to campus and stopped in front of a huge stone mansion which (as we soon learned) had been owned by the President of Campbell Soup (and the guy who invented condensed soup). The mansion was one of the few buildings on campus when this was started as a women’s college in the late ‘50s. When they went coed in the early ‘70s, they built a dorm for the males “down the way,” according to the tour guide while the mansion remained as a dorm for females. Most of the university buildings have gone up since going coed giving the campus a clean, new feel. It’s grown so quickly that it now has gained University status (as of July 1, 2016).

Cabrini chapel

The chapel

Cabrini is a Catholic college started by the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart (which, unfortunately, is a dying order according to the admissions rep). Just over 1/3 of students self-identify as Catholic; about 30% don’t report a religious affiliation. Students are required to take one religion class; our tour guide’s class was Search for Meaning. She loved it because talked about all religions and students could make it personal to their own journey.

Cabrini acad bldgEngagement with the Common Good (or ECG) is one core requirement; this is another distinctive curriculum piece that makes Cabrini stand out, and students had a lot of positive things to say about it. Students take 4 interdisciplinary classes over the four years designed to raise awareness of social issues and give students hands-on experiences in community service and/or solving problems. One student took “Our Interdependent World” which looked at things like social justice, refugees, and climate change. These classes take the place of Comp 101. It’s writing-intensive, but based on current events.

Cabrini dorms

One of the new dorms

The people we talked to said that the community is well-integrated and people are accepting of others. Of the 1300 full-time students, just under 40% (almost equally divided) self-report as African-American or Hispanic. They have doubled the number of Hispanic students in the last few years and are working on becoming a Hispanic-Serving institution (requiring at least 25% Hispanic population). They’re working on bringing in more students from South America; the Sisters are pretty active down there.

Cabrini dorm int

The interior of a dorm

The campus is in a residential area of town; not much is within walking distance, but shuttles run 15-20 times a day around town, and all students can have cars. Campus is quiet and safe. “I’ve never heard of anyone using the blue lights. Sometimes a goose will approach you … but that’s about it,” said the tour guide.

This is still mostly a regional institution. A vast majority of students come from mid-Atlantic “ranging from Connecticut to Virginia, an in Pennsylvania, east of the Susquehanna River,” an admissions rep told us. However, most freshmen (90%) live on campus. This drops to about 40% overall after first year. A couple students on the panel were commuters and never felt like they weren’t part of the community. In addition to Living Learning Communities for first and second year students, Cabrini recently created a Commuter LLC; about 25 students get involved every year, and although they don’t live there, they meet regularly.

They’ve created several new dorm options in an effort to increase the number of upperclassmen on campus. Upperclassmen can get suites that are often arranged in “pods” – 4 or 5 bedrooms with 1 bathroom. Dorms house anywhere from 20 to 250 students, and rooms are spacious. There are some triples which are huge. Singles, doubles, and triples were interspersed along the hall we saw. Food on campus “is pretty good! People get very excited about the pickles. I don’t know what that’s about.” Chicken Nugget Tuesday is also popular.

Cabrini tv studio

A tv studio

The academic program most worth noting is Digital Communications and Social Media, although pretty much anything in their Communications department is going to be excellent. The studios and technology are amazing. Comcast uses the studios on the last Friday of the month, often hiring Cabrini students to help. They share a radio frequency with Villanova. The newspaper is published every 2 weeks, but the online newspaper is done more frequently.

Cabrini radio station

A radio station

A couple other majors of note include: Molecular Biology and BioTechnology, Gender and Body Studies, and Health and Wellness Management. They also have multiple dual-degree options including:

  • Hospitality Management and Tourism (BS in any Business major, MHTM from Widener)
  • 3+3 Law Degree with Widener
  • Podiatric Medicine (3+4): BS Biology, DPM from Temple
  • Pharmacy (3+4): BS Biology, PharmD from Thomas Jefferson Univ. School of Pharmacy
  • Social work: 5-year BSW/MSW with Widener
  • Dentistry: (3+4): BS Biology, DMD from Temple
  • Nursing (4+1) with Villanova or Temple

The students’ favorite classes include:

  • Scriptwriting: “We got a great hands-on experience!”
  • Media Influences and Psychological Development: “We looked at music, music, tv, even Barney and how those things influence people.”
  • Engagements and the Common Good. “We participated in role-playing historical scenes. I was a protester at the Convention in 1968.”
  • Multimedia story Creation: “We made 3-5 minute videos that were like documentaries. It taught me all aspect of media but also a LOT of patience! Editing takes so much time.”
  • Photo for Publication: “ We got assignments from the newspaper. I did a lot of the sports games. We took trips off campus around Philly. It was very hands-on and taught lots of cool tricks with the camera.”

They do have an Honors College; students applying to the school will get flagged for this if they have a 3.5 GPA and will get a chance to apply for HC. To stay in, students take 4 honors classes the first year (including their ECG, and Search for Meaning classes) and at least 1 a year after that. The Honors LC has a Master Learner, an upper level student who has already taken those classes, and honors students have special trips (like to the Philly Orchestra) and other events.

© 2016

Saint Leo University

Saint Leo University (visited 2/9/16)

St Leo treeThis is a stunning campus: clean, well-landscaped, and with new/renovated buildings that seem to have been planned out and meant to go together. There’s plenty of open space with a lake on the edge of campus. Students seem genuinely happy here: they’re interacting with each other and using all sorts of spaces available to them.

St Leo chapel int

Interior of the Chapel

Located in the small town of Saint Leo, this is a religious school with definite Catholic overtones. “Students are spiritual. There’s a sense of faith, but it’s not forced.” Students do have to take 2 religion classes but there’s enough variety to satisfy everyone. The campus chapel hosts masses which they open to the public; student attendance is not mandatory. Monks and nuns still live on campus and some of them even run a local garage to pay for electricity, etc

St Leo tea in library

The coffee and tea table in the library

The Core Values of the school (Respect, Excellence, Personal Development, Integrity, Community, and Responsible Stewardship) are heavily integrated into the curriculum and in other ways across campus. For example, the new Business building incorporated wood from the trees cut down to create space for the building. The library has coffee and tea out all the time for the students; the area was neat and well kept up. A couple students were helping themselves and picking up after themselves to keep it in good shape for the next person.

St Leo quad 3This is a residential campus with lots of open space. All freshmen and students need the unlimited meal plan. Once students move into a building with a kitchen (and most upperclassmen end up with their own rooms), they can drop down to the 5 or 10 meals a week plan. One of the dorms has an amazing lounge (open to all students) with a huge fish tank designed by Tanked (take a look for it on the Discovery Chanel!), a game room (including SkeetBall and pinball), plenty of tvs, and even sleep pods!

St Leo fishtanks

The fish tank

The 2,370 students come from almost every state and 66 countries drawing heavily from the Caribbean and South America. It’s almost evenly split gender-wise (with slightly more females than males). Tuition, Room, and Board run $30,700 making it a great deal.

St Leo activities

Monthly activity calendar

I talked to several students in the dining hall who said they all were really happy with the school: “Tell your students to come here!” said one student, and others nodded in agreement. They did make sure to say that social life revolves around campus. The town of St. Leo has very little to do, but Dade City is a 5-10 minute drive. Another said, “Bring a car or you’re out of luck!” Orlando is an hour or so away (and Orientation includes a trip to Disney or Epcot). Greek life is present but not huge. Freshmen can’t rush until they earn a certain number of credits. Bingo is a big deal on campus. “They give away insane prizes like GoPro, X Boxes, etc. People get really hyped up for this. Sometimes it’s even themed, like people will come in costume for Halloween.” Sports are DIII (playing in the Sunshine Sate Conference). Rivals depend on the sport: UT is big because of proximity.

St Leo business classrm

One of the classrooms in the business building

Business (including Sport Business, Health Care Management, and International Tourism & Hospitality Management), Criminal Justice, Education, Social Work, and Computer Science are their flagship programs. Students can choose specialties not often found at schools this size such as Criminalistics or Homeland Security within Criminal Justice or Advanced Literary Study, Dramaturgy, or Professional Writing within the English Department. They offer a Multimedia Management major; students learn management of social media, shoot commercials, etc. They have two 3+1 programs: marketing or management undergraduate with an MBA, and a computer science bachelors with a Masters in Cyber Security. Students in the Honors Program are automatically eligible for these programs (others have to apply).

Students all get a laptop or iPad. If they transfer out, they have to return it, but if they graduate, they can keep it.

Applying is free if done online, and they’re test-optional if the student has a 3.0+ GPA in high school. International students must prove English proficiency either by attending an English-speaking high school for all 4 years, by earning a 450 CR on the SAT (or equivalent ACT), or submitting a TOEFL score; St. Leo does offer a Bridge Program if students need to meet proficiency.

© 2016

Roberts Wesleyan College

Roberts Wesleyan College (visited 10/20/15)

~RWC quad 1I decided to swing by Roberts because I had a couple hours to kill before flying out of the Rochester airport. It’s a very pretty, traditional-looking campus. There were only a few people walking around, and at first, mostly adults. We did finally see some students walking around campus; when we asked people if campus was usually this quiet, they looked a bit like they had never noticed, and said that they thought that classes were probably in session so there weren’t likely to see too many people.

~RWC quad 4Although this is very close to Rochester (probably 15-20 minutes into downtown), the campus definitely has a rural feel. There isn’t much in easy walking distance, but students can have cars on campus. I stopped and talked to a couple students around campus (often the best way to get the unfiltered view since they aren’t working for admissions!). One student said that the thing she doesn’t like is that there’s not much to do on the weekends, but most students do stick around campus. There’s a $1 theater and laser tag nearby and sometimes people will go into Rochester, although she wasn’t sure if the school offered shuttles: “My roommate has a car so I haven’t paid attention.”

Some of the dorm buildings

Some of the dorm buildings

The first student I spoke to was a freshman. “I’d rate the school an 8.” She loves the faculty who she says are friendly and really willing to engage with students. This seemed to be true. I talked with two adults who were both talkative and willing to reach out to people. The first asked us if she could help us find anything and then helped us get to the admissions office; the other was a music professor. She walked with us across campus and chatted: she’d been at the school more than 20 years and loved the changes that were happening. “You wouldn’t recognize it! There’s been a lot of additions and improvements.”

Theater lobby

Theater lobby

Original building, now housing some of the Music department

Original building, now housing some of the Music department

Music is fairly big here. In the few minutes I spent talking to a student outside one of their major music and theater buildings, students walked by carrying French Horns, trombones, violins, and more. The music professor said that there are between 60-90 students in the department each year, and they’ve just started an honors chorus and honors band. The old theater building (now practice rooms, offices, classrooms, etc) is supposedly haunted; it had belonged to Mr. Roberts who donated the land to start the school. His funeral was held there.

~RWC acad bldg 3The school offers fairly standard liberal arts major offerings. Unusual ones include Economic Crime Investigation, Social Work, and Medical Technologist. They offer a 3-2 Engineering program with RIT, RPI, and Clarkson, as well as accelerated 3-year programs in Psychology and Social Work.

~RWC acad bldg 3Advice one student gave to pass onto students thinking about Roberts is, “Make sure they’re ok with the chapel requirement.” Students have to earn 22 chapel credits each semester (attendance at 1 chapel = 1 credit). Monday is a more traditional, non-denominational service; Wednesday tends to be student-led services or programs; Friday is a discussion session. Students can earn 3 chapel credits if they participate in one of the community service projects on Saturdays.

(c) 2015

University of Michigan

University of Michigan (visited 1/31/15)

Archaeology Museum

Archaeology Museum

~Michigan bldg and tower 2I did not get a conventional tour at Michigan because their admission office is not open on Saturday (except for a few rare dates scattered throughout the year). I’m a little shocked at this. It’s a major university; people want to visit and tour. I got the feeling from talking to their admissions office that it just didn’t matter; they assumed people would conform to whatever schedule they put forth, and really, they’re mostly right. They’ve got the name and reputation. Therefore, they clearly don’t have to try. However, this also seems to be indicative of how the university runs as a whole. They’ll give you a world class education, but you’re on your own to seek it out, meet them on their terms, and do what you need to do by yourself.

One of the streets surrounding the university

One of the streets surrounding the university

The "Diag"

The “Diag”

Because I couldn’t rearrange my schedule in order to arrive on a weekday for a conventional tour, I reached out to a friend doing a graduate program at the university. She spent a few hours walking around with me. Although I didn’t get the “party line” and couldn’t ask the tour guide about his/her experiences, I think that I ended up getting much more than I would have on a school-based tour. We walked through much of the area surrounding campus, walked through a lot of the university buildings, had lunch at a local restaurant, and I got the uncensored impressions of the students and school from someone not working for admissions.

The lobby of the Business Buiding

The lobby of the Business Buiding

The Business school

The Business school

“The classes are great, but they’re big.” She said that it’s hard to get advising sometimes, hard to make sure you’re taking the classes you need, hard to get access to some classes. She’s a TA and knows that a lot of the undergrads’ educations were coming from people like her. I asked her what she thought of the university in relation to Berkeley where she did her undergraduate work. “They’re a lot alike. You need the sharp elbows here, too.” However, she said that the students are very different at Michigan. “Maybe I’m jaded after Berkeley, but Michigan is supposed to be this bastion of liberalism. It just isn’t.” She described the overall student body as “rich and conforming.” There are a lot of girls with the stick-straight hair and the “right clothes and right bags.” That’s not to say that there’s not diversity. Clearly there is. It’s a huge school (about 28,000 undergrads); you’ll find some of everyone here. However, there seems to be an overarching culture of conformity. The students I saw as I walked around campus backed up that assessment.

The "fishbowl" - one of the computer labs on campus

The “fishbowl” – one of the computer labs on campus

~Michigan bldg 5Students who will do well here are those who want to study on Saturday afternoons and those who are hyper-independent with “sharp elbows” (aka who will fight classes, housing, etc) and who can figure out what they need and then know which questions to ask in order to get what they need – academically and socially – without help. “It’s the type of school where you can easily fall through the cracks, especially the first year. You don’t know what you need until it’s too late and you’ve missed an opportunity or a deadline.”

~Michigan bikes~Michigan treeAs we walked through the library and then the union, students packed every available space and were studying. There was some socialization going on, but very little. Books were open, papers were being written, areas were relatively quiet. It’s the sort of scene I would have expected more on a Sunday afternoon than on a Saturday. Students here clearly take their learning seriously. However, there were also a lot of students out on the “Diag” (diagonal path cutting across the quad) and heading in and out of buildings. Even on a cold, dreary day, there was plenty going on around campus. The blocks surrounding campus are clearly geared towards meeting students’ needs. There’s a vague sense of “counterculture” but most of the stores were typical college-student places: cafes, restaurants, book stores. There’s no shortage of things to do on or around campus.

Law School quad

Law School quad

Most students study in the Liberal Arts College (LSA: Literature, Science, and the Arts). Freshmen can also apply to Architecture, Engineering, Performing Arts, Kinesiology, and Nursing. Students interested in Education, Business, Social Work, Pharmacy, Public Policy, and some other programs must apply and be accepted into the program during freshman or sophomore years (although some give Freshman Preferred Admissions, aka guaranteed placement, when they’re accepted to the university).

Unusual majors include: Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies; Interarts Performance; Microbiology; Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering; and Screen Arts and Culture.

(c) 2015

Adrian College

Adrian College (visited 1/31/15)

~Adrian mall

The “mall”

I had high hopes for Adrian; I had heard the name and knew the basics so I was curious to find out more. I was a little concerned about the retention rate; unfortunately my visit didn’t entirely alleviate my fears in that realm. However, I really liked the students I spoke to, the people in the admission office, and the campus. Athletes, B to B+ students, and students who will get involved and who want small classes will thrive at Adrian.

~Adrian 1~Adrian auditoriumMy tour guide was surprised at how much he loved Adrian. “I really had wanted to go to Notre Dame but didn’t get in. I got into Michigan, had put down my deposit, had a roommate picked out – but then came back here to visit. I changed my mind that day and deposited.” His parents both went to Adrian and were thrilled that he chose to go – and he got a legacy scholarship which helps! People he knows who have left did so for a variety of reasons: some wanted to be closer to home, one joined the army, some thought college wasn’t for them. A lot of football players were recruited from Florida and hated the winters in Michigan.

~Adrian mural

Mural outside the Student Center

fabric samples for Interior Design students

fabric samples for Interior Design students

The campus is nice, even in the middle of winter. Every year, they hold a Creativity Awards contest. The winner gets $10,000 to improve campus. So far winners included a large mural outside the student center, bike racks/bike share, International Walkway with things written in multiple languages, etc. “During the year, there’s something like 1000 flower baskets,” said the tour guide. “I wish you could see it then. All the art on campus is student-created. They have an extensive art program with a dance studio, photo labs, pre-architecture, and Interior Design. One studio has 90 styles of lighting for the architecture students! Music is also big here, and the city of Adrian has a symphony that uses the college’s theater.

Adrian Thinker

The Thinker in front of the Theater

~Adrian stud centr 2

The new student center; study boxes are on the upper left

The oldest building on campus, once a stop on the Underground Railroad, is a three-story stone building now used as the theatre. They do a great job refurbishing buildings for updated purposes. The student center is the old gym. They spectator boxes are now study boxes that are open 24/7. The Salon in the basement advertises “nails, hair, and tanning.” The Starbucks in the first floor takes flex bucks.

About 20% of the students go Greek. “There are a lot of Greeks in Admissions. They tend to be most involved in campus life. They love the school.”

Adrian baseball practice

Baseball practice

Almost 2/3 of the students are athletes and there’s a lot of support for the teams. There was a cheer competition in the gym as we went through around 10am on a Saturday. Several girls had pulled exercise bikes over outside the glass doors to watch as they worked out. Adrian’s hockey rink is the only one in the area, so community teams use it as well. A Community Team was using it that morning. 200 Adrian students play hockey on one of 6 teams (4 men, 2 women). They have DI club teams for both men and women; varsity is DIII. They also have synchronized skating and figure skating. Hope is the big rival. They’re quadrupling the size of the weight room (it’s currently tiny).

~Adrian quad

Quad and the library

A popular study area in the Science Building

A popular study area in the Science Building

The tour guide’s largest class was 30 in his Intro to Sociology class. Smallest were 6 (Freshman Writing) and 3 (upper level Econ). “They’re getting rid of the Econ major, so I’m taking a lot of upper level classes and individucal studies so I can finish before they phase it out.” He took Kitchen Chemistry – they did a lot of baking to experiment with how different things influenced the outcome; they ate an fruit that blocked most taste receptors and ate different foods before and after to test this; worked with yeast, etc. He loved his Movies and Culture class in which they discussed social aspects of films starting back in the 30s.

~Adrian dorms

The convenience store on campus with dorms in the background

There are lots of housing options. The freshman dorms are traditional style and old. “I think they’re the same buildings my parents lived in when they were here.” However, after first year, students can live in dorms, apartments, one of 24 theme houses (which can be as small as 4 students), themed houses, fraternities, etc. There are also plenty of flexible meal options. One style is Block Style (students get a certain number of swipes per semester which can be used back-to-back if they want to swipe in a guest). Another style is the 14- or 18-meal-per-week (which can be used once every 4 hours). “The quality of the food is fine but it gets boring.”

~Adrian chapel interior

Chapel

This started as a Methodist school but is now loosely affiliated at best. My tour guide was a Methodist and will go downtown to services; Catholic students often go over to Siena Heights University which is a few miles down the road. There’s a non-denominational service on Wednesdays in which a religion student will give the sermon. Students can bring lunch to chapel.

~Adrian music wing

The music wing: offices and practice rooms.

Their Accounting and Business program is strong with 11 concentrations to choose from including Event & Facilities Management, Health Care Management, Sports Management, and Fashion Merchandising. The Director of Entrepreneurship brought Dominos and Little Ceasars pizza to Israel before he started to teach. Criminal Justice, Social Work, and Art History are also worth noting.

The college offers several Internal Masters (open only to Adrian students). Several students will use the Athletic Training and Industrial Chemistry Masters as a gateway to Med School. 98% of students get placed in med schools or in to the health field upon graduation.

(c) 2015

Castleton State College

CASTLETON STATE (visited 4/16/14)

~Castleton dining hall

Dining Hall

Castleton is the oldest college in Vermont and the 18th oldest in the U.S. (founded shortly after College of Charleston in SC). However, facilities are modern and comfortable: they’ve put over $70 million in renovations and new buildings over the last 10 years or so. One of the new buildings is a pavilion where they now hold graduation, and in the winter, they flood it to make a skating rink.

One of the new dorms

One of the new dorms

They serve a variety of students – they have the A kid in the Honors College and the C kids who have amazing transformations. Thirty percent of their students come from out-of-state, and 50% are first-generation college students.

~Castleton 2They bring in a lot of events, but they are quick to acknowledge that “Castleton isn’t exactly the most bustling of towns,” so they give students the opportunity to get off campus with buses to Yankees and Red Sox games, concerts, city trips, and more. Skiers can get a season pass to all 3 major ski resorts in the area (including Killington) for $300 a year. A Rail Trail goes right by campus which is great for runners or cross-country skiers. Our tour guide was surprised ~Castleton quadat how big sports were here, which range from intramural to varsity. Some of the more unusual sports offered are Freestyle Skiing and Snowboarding (Club), Mountain Biking, Homerun Derby, Wallyball, Water Polo, and Dodge Ball (they were recently listed in the Guinness World Record book for the longest Dodge Ball tournament that lasted 41 hours).

~Castleton study area

Student Center

Two other students were surprised at the community and level of support. First Year students meet once a week with advisors who make sure they’re being challenged and supported. Their retention is starting to go up (currently at 70%). Forty percent of each dorm is reserved for freshmen who are mixed through the dorms. Our tour guide, a senior, lived next door to freshmen. The dorms are single-sex by suite, and rooms are spacious.

~Castleton sports complex

Sports Complex

Academics of note include Athletic Training, Computer Information Systems, Global Studies, Geology, Social Work, and Sports Administration. The school does a good job linking academics and clubs, sending students to conferences, helping set up internships, and in other ways giving students real-world experiences related to their majors.

© 2014

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