campus encounters

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Archive for the tag “Public Health”

Muhlenberg College

Muhlenberg College (visited 4/24/18)

Muhlenberg 4The tour guide at Muhlenberg was one of the best I’ve ever had! If the other students are half as much fun as him, I can see why people really want to be here. “There is a palpable sense of welcome here. People hold doors. I hope you get the sense that the students matter … because they do. They can be their true selves while they are with us,” said one of the reps.

Muhlenberg sculpture 3The rep went on to talk about what makes Muhlenberg distinct; I found this refreshing since most schools don’t – or can’t – articulate this.

  • Students are active and definitely goal-oriented. They want to do things with their lives. They want to capitalize on their experiences without sacrificing interests, so many have double discipline degree: “It’s not unusual to see people majoring in theater and physics, Neuroscience and Jewish Studies, or Bio and Business. This makes sense at Muhlenberg. We help them make it work.”
  • This is one of the most religiously diverse campuses around. “We’re 1/3 Catholic, 1/3 Jewish, 1/3 mix of others.” The Hillel pairs up with Cedar Crest, located about a mile away. Jewish life is incredibly active.
  • They offer Liberal Arts with strong professional development: “We’re just as committed to preparing for Accounting and Finance as for pre-med/law.” They’re a Top-30 accounting school where students earn 150 credit hours in 4 years! They sit for their CPAs at the end.
  • Muhlenberg book sculpture 2They’re nationally recognized for theater and the arts: “There are 350 music lessons on campus in any given week. We don’t have 350 music majors!” said a rep. “We’re in tech-week every week of the semester.” There’s a dance, theater, and/or musical production every other week. Theater, Dance, and Music are all BA degrees, not BFA. This is intentional so they can double major. There is a huge selection of classes so they can direct, do technical work, etc. The university name carries weight!
  • They’re nationally ranked for their food. Kosher dining is integrated into the dining hall so they can still eat with their friends.

As a member of the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges, Muhlenberg students can cross-register at the other 5 schools, but because they have such a range of options on campus, they usually do not. However, there are some groups that collaborate, students are able to attend events on other campuses, etc.

Muhlenberg library intFaculty are “fiercely devoted.” They are invested in who the students are and who they’ll become. Students make things happen every day at Muhlenberg and they’re empowered to collaborate with administration to make that happen. For example, they now offer a Public Health Major; prior to 2016, this was a minor with over 100 people in the program. Because of student engagement, they made it a major, and there are 2 partnerships with BU and in Philly that wouldn’t have happened without the students pushing for it.

Muhlenberg chapel int“We want to fill our seats with people who want to be here. We fill almost half the class through ED.” They will do an early read for merit and financial aid if that’s an issue before they enter into that partnership. Interviews are really important here; they value that interaction and getting to know students. They’re armed better in committee to advocate for the students.

“We don’t just have one friend group because we all do so much, so we know a lot of people who we go to support,” said the tour guide. Almost all students live on campus which helps build community. Their DIII and club sports teams are popular (to participate in and to watch) as are all the artistic performances. About 20% of students join Greek life. Traditions are really important on campus. Our tour guide said that his favorite is Candle Lighting. At Freshman orientation, they receive their candle which they light; they keep this all 4 years and will relight it again the night before graduation with their families looking on. “Usually it’s lit by alumni while an a capella group sings the alma mater right. It’s kind of transcendent. Generations before us did this. I’ve lost my laptop, but I know where that candle is.”

Muhlenberg Victor's LamentCampus is mostly attractive; there’s a large sculpture that looks very out of place against the stone buildings: “Its name is Victor’s Lament,” explained the tour guide, saying that it was meant to represent a wounded soldier being carried in Vietnam. After it was donated to the school, it was painted red because of the school colors. The sculptor was furious and withdrew his other donations.

© 2018

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Williams College

~Williams sign 2Williams College (visited 7/29/15)

This is one of the few information sessions I’ve attended where the presenter gave more than just lip-service to the concept of fit. For example, she asked if classes of 13 seemed too big (no one) or too small (1 student) – and then told him that this might not be the right place for him.

~Williams env cntr

Williams’ entirely sustainable Environmental Center

Williams provides a great deal of opportunity for students to pursue what they’re curious about. Students must take 3 classes in each of 3 divisions but what they take is up within those areas is up to them. Majors are mostly fairly straightforward, but Concentrations (minors) are more interdisciplinary such as Justice and Law, Cognitive Science, and Public Health.

~Williams 2This is one of a few places that offers Oxford-like Tutorials: students are initially placed in groups of 10 then split into pairs. Students alternate between writing a 5-7 page paper (sent to the professor and partner 24 hours in advance) and responding to the peer’s paper (with a 24 hour turnaround). At Tutorial, they discuss it, usually with the professor simply observing. Students get really good at developing and defending a point of view. Half the students take at least 1 Tutorial (which are offered in all subject areas); most will take more than one.

~Williams 4Williams operates on a 4-1-4 schedule: 4 classes in fall and spring and 1 class in January (yes, it’s required every year). All freshmen stay on campus; after that, students can stay, do an internship, or study-away. Class offerings range from academic to experiential; all are Pass/Fail to encourage students to try something new or focus on a passion.

For the same reason, Study Abroad classes also come back as pass/fail with the exception of 3 Williams-specific programs that are graded:

  • Oxford where they’re considered full Oxford students and participate in tutorials
  • Mystic Seaport, CT focusing on oceanography. Part of the experience includes 10 days at sea on a tall ship.
  • South Africa: students study at the University of Cape Town and complete an internship.

~Williams sci cntr int

Intro science lectures can have up to 100 students (but smaller labs). One student’s largest class was “Chemistry of AIDS” with 75. Another student’s biggest class had 30 (Intro to Econ) and smallest was 7 (an English Seminar). APs can’t replace credits (ie, they must still earn a certain number of credits at Williams), but the scores can place students into a higher level and out of some of the biggest classes.

Most research funding (including Room and Board during the summer) goes to science and math but students can research anywhere. Our tour guide did research on Bilateral Relations with Russia and China. One math professor is a leading researcher on knots of all things. He took on 14 students to research knots. About 40% of those doing research will co-author a paper by graduation.

~Williams theater

The campus theater building

Williamstown is small (population: 7,000), nestled squarely in the northwestern Massachusetts Arts “corridor” with MASS MoCA just down the street. Arts are a huge deal here. The local theater is nationally known and draws big-name actors like Kyra Sedgewick, Kevin Bacon, and Bradley Cooper. “Here we are in this little town bumping into the Hollywood people.” William’s music, fine arts, theater, and art history programs are all excellent. The directors of MOMA, the National Gallery, the Gugenheim, and more are Williams grads: “It’s like we’re producing the Art History Mafia here.”

If small-town New England starts feeling too isolated, students can hop on a regional bus that stops on campus and head to Albany or Boston. The school runs shuttles to Albany and Grand Central (which may be subsidized for students on financial aid) at breaks.

~Williams Hillel

The Hillel building

There is lots of schools spirit here. About 1/3 of students play varsity sports, and stands fill up at games. Amherst is their big rival and has been since 1820 when Williams’ president took half of everything – faculty, library books, the money – and started Amherst. Several years ago, Amherst pulled a prank on Williams by carving an A into one of their fields. Williams retaliated by carving a B+ on theirs.

Most students (85%) live on campus. Up to 125 seniors can move off campus, but they didn’t have that many petition to do so this year.

~Williams dorm quad

Freshman quad

Entry Program groups together 25ish first-year students and 2 Junior Advisors to give them a “home base” and a family-feel to what is otherwise a fairly typical dorm situation. For example, they’ll do Entry Snacks on Sunday night for a “catch-up.” It is unique that they freshmen have 2 JAs grouped with them – but the tour guide bragged incessantly about how Williams mixes dorm-mates so they get to meet a variety of people – without realizing that many other places do this, too!

~Williams student cntr int

The “Main Living Room” in the Student Center

The main dining hall in the student center can get busy; at peak rush, “the wait can be 10 or 15 minutes, but there are other places to eat if you’re in a hurry.” Sunday “Kids Night” dinner (mac and cheese, chicken fingers, etc.) gets rave reviews, but the food is good overall. “This place has the best chicken tikka masala I’ve ever had,” said the tour guide.

The Outdoor Club is one of the biggest clubs; a $10 fee gets students access to everything they offer. Mountain Day (a surprise day-off from classes with picnics, hiking, etc) is a huge deal like at many other colleges. There’s also a day in the winter when classes are canceled for a day of skiing, sledding, and more, but students know about that in advance.

Admissions is highly selective, but they do accept about 40% of ED applicants “because it’s self-selecting and they often have a previous relationship with the college.” Applicants need 2 subject tests on addition to the SAT or ACT. “Don’t take both math tests, but other than that, choose whatever you want.” The Optional Supplement “really is optional. Use it if you feel like there’s something you need to add to the application.” Admissions is need-blind, and students need to submit both the FAFSA and CSS Profile. They do not offer merit scholarships; average debt at graduation is $13,000.

(c) 2015

St. Louis University

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY (visited 4/12/13)

SLU 1 SLU (pronounced “slew”) impressed me immediately with the vibrant atmosphere and the gorgeous campus. Although it was a cloudy, chilly day, students were out in booths selling cupcakes, doing martial arts, etc. We asked a student for help getting to the admissions office, and she was perky, helpful, and just plain nice. It’s true what they say about getting an immediate gut reaction to a school; SLU delivers.

SLU 6SLU is clearly doing something right since they have an 88% retention rate. Our tour guide was one of the best couple tour guides I’ve ever had. Completely excited, passionate, and knowledgeable about the school, he described it as one that lets students discover and explore passions. There’s very little he doesn’t like here; the only thing he thinks he would like to change is making Atlas Week (when the school brings in a ton of speakers) longer. He is “still deciding” (aka what SLU calls “undeclared,” and is the most popular “major” for freshmen). He works closely with advisors dedicated to students who are still figuring out what they want to do.

SLU 7

The aviation building.

SLU works to expand academic offerings and have recently added several new programs to keep up with student interests and job projections. They’re very proud of their extensive list of “firsts”: the first college west of the Mississippi, America’s first federally licensed school of aviation in 1927, the first US university with its own campus in Europe, and more. Aviation and Aeronautics (Flight Science, aviation management, and engineering) are strong here. Health Sciences (including Investigative and Medical Sciences, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology) and Engineering (including Engineering Physics) are also popular. The most recent additions are Public Health, Health Information ManagementAfrican-American Studies, and Anthropology. All majors are direct-entry so students can start their major as early as freshman year. However, students who want to major in Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, or Nursing must begin as freshman if they want to graduate on time, and they must complete the entire major at SLU. Students interested in these majors must apply by 12/1 because they tend to fill up; if students are unsure about majoring in one of these areas, they recommend listing it as the intended major on the application; switching out is easy but students cannot transfer in.

SLU 5

One of the many statues around campus.

Applying is easy; SLU will take either the Common App or the school-based app, and there’s no application fee. They recommend an interview, a resume, and letters of rec. They will not super-score either the SAT or ACT, but will take highest composite. They start accepting apps on September 1 and make decisions on a rolling basis, but they set a priority deadline of 12/1 for scholarship consideration; they don’t guarantee consideration for scholarships after that. The Honors and Scholars deadlines vary between 12/1 and 2/1 with decisions announced by 3/1.

SLU 4

An academic building.

Their honors and scholars programs include the Cook program (students finish in three years), Accounting (a 5-year program in which students finish with a CPA license), Medical (students are guaranteed an entry interview a year before other candidates, and the MCAT score does not factor into the application), Prelaw (guaranteed entry into their law school if they maintain the minimum GPA), and Honors (students take at least 24 hours of Honors Credits, do an honors thesis project, can register for classes earlier, and get a fancier diploma).

The Carnegie Foundation has ranked SLU as a High-Research-Activity University, a testament to the level at which students get involved in their academics. Our tour guide’s classes have ranged in size from 12 (Spanish class) to 200 (Intro to Bio). There are only three lecture halls in the entire university, and they’re located under a small quad. Often the large classes of 150-200 students are introductory level, usually in the sciences; students will be assigned to smaller break-out or lab sections. The school has strong sciences and a popular pre-med track (anything “pre” is a track, not a major); students have to take those science classes here at SLU. As a side-note, SLU is rated #1 in Health Care Law, as well!

One of the Residential complexes in the middle of campus.

One of the Residential complexes in the middle of campus.

Living on campus is about the “Four-Frees: wifi, cable, laundry, and shuttle.” About 3800 students live on campus, located in the middle of St. Louis (although once you’re on campus, it’s easy to forget that you’re in a city). Freshmen and sophomores are required to live on campus unless they live with parents within a 50 mile radius. SLU offers several living options for all students. First, there are several Learning-Living Communities based on academic or extracurricular interest; the language floors require a signed contract that only that language will be used on the floor. The Griesedieck Complex, located conveniently in the middle of campus, is comprised of one 15-story building (coed by floor) flanked by two 5-story buildings (1 male, 1 female). These are traditional double-occupancy rooms with hall baths, but each room has a sink. Reinert Hall houses 400 freshmen about two blocks from campus, but rooms are bigger and it has private bathrooms. It’s also located right across the street from a Starbucks and Chipotle (a popular spot). The Upperclassman-only Marchetti building is a 12-story complex with everything from studios to two-bedroom apartments. All apartments above the first floor have balconies. No freshmen live here. The Village Apartments are probably the best, according to students. It’s mostly Juniors and Seniors with a “few lucky sophomores.” “Off-campus housing” usually means within two blocks of campus where there are plenty of apartment complexes and houses for rent; it’s very easy to find places to live, and the SLU police force (the third largest in the state!) will also patrol a couple blocks off campus. Students feel safe and will walk around campus at night without worrying.

There are extensive options of activities to keep busy on and off campus, including over 200 clubs and organizations on campus. Their DI athletics place them as the only St. Louis school in the Atlanta 10 Conference, and about 20% of students participate in Greek life with Rush happening during first semester of freshmen year. They is no Greek housing, but students can choose to live on a floor with others in their organization. The campus is located centrally in the city giving students the Fox Theater is only a block away, and students can get the “best available seat” for $20 with their ID. They’re only a couple miles from the Riverfront (the Arch) and Busch Stadium. In the other direction, they’re not far from Forest Park (which is bigger than Central Park in NY), the Science Center, Botanical Gardens, and other free things to do.

SLU 2This is the second oldest Jesuit school in the nation after Georgetown, and the small crucifixes and pictures of St. Ignatius prominently displayed around campus serve as reminders of its Jesuit identity which revolves around “men and women for others.” They pride themselves on the combination of education and service, education of the whole person, and doing things in an ethical manner. Students participate in over a million hours of service each year through a variety of organizations such as Campus Kitchen, Relay for Life, and a Business student group. Next to the beautiful campus chapel is a large apartment-style building; I asked if it was a dorm, and our tour guide told us that they were apartments for the Jesuits, many of whom teach or otherwise work at the university. This area has the largest Jesuit pop in the US.

Their mascot is a Billiken (they’re the only school in the country to have this) which is a mythical creature that originally looked a little like a Buddha combined with . . . a smurf? A goblin? It’s hard to describe. It was created in the early 1900s by an art professor and is seen as a good-luck charm or “The god of things as they ought to be.” It’s become this cute little ghostish-smurfish-impish creature.

(c) 2013

UMass Amherst

U Mass Amherst (visited 10/15/12)

UMass Amherst stud unionUMass Amherst 2I’m not sure that I know much more about UMass now than I knew before I went. The people were extremely nice; breakfast was tasty; the morning was well organized. However, I didn’t learn much about the school. Case in point: The tour guide was giving us an introductory spiel as we stood in the Union. As he described the campus, he said that it was like a bulls-eye. The Union was the center (and is one of the most used buildings); buildings that are used a lot but not consistently through the course of the day like dorms or academic buildings were surrounding the union. The outskirts were specialized buildings or programs “like the equestrian program. You don’t really need to see the horses on the way to class.” After an extensive presentation by the admissions staff (including how many millions of dollars are being poured into construction), we hadn’t heard anything about the equestrian program; if the tour guide hadn’t mentioned it in the layout of the campus, we would have left not even knowing it existed!

P1000950

The view from the library

UMass Amherst campus 2There are a few things that people at UMass seem particularly proud of. First, they got full DI status for their football team this year. Because they don’t have a stadium on campus yet, they’re playing at Gillette in Foxboro (where the Patriots play). They’re offering buses for students for the games, and they filled 35 for the opening game. Second, they like to talk about the variety of clubs and activities available on campus, including the Goat-herding club, quidditch team, and a humans vs. zombie club. This must be the “go-to” selling point, because three different people told us about these 3 specific clubs. Finally, their Student Rec Center has just gotten renovated; it’s 3 floors and beautiful. 500,000 people used it last year.

Umass Amherst courtyardUMass Amherst 1This is the largest public university in New England with about 22,000 undergrads. The university prides itself on its diversity in every context: racial, religious, geographic, socio-economic. “Students will find people who are just like them, and people completely different. They’ll find people with similar interests, and students with interests that will leave them shaking their heads.” The admissions team talked comprehensively about the student experience in which the university provides a series of smaller communities within the context of a major, national, research university. They do this through Residence Halls; groups arranged around majors, community service, or other topics of interest; and good advising and orientation programs. New students work with faculty from the department to help select classes, a task which can be daunting, especially for freshmen. They also have a program called First Year Intelligence which introduces new students to campus, help them adjust, and strengthen their chances for collegiate success. This starts with both a summer and a fall Orientation, and then continues through the year. Students can opt to live in a Residential Academic Program (RAP) where they can take classes in the hall, among other things. There are a variety of RAPs: Topic RAP for students with a particular (not necessarily related to major); Foundation RAP (in which they take a class in common with people they live with); Focus Rap (for undeclared majors to help them explore options); Honors RAP; and Majors RAP.

UMass Amherst dorms

Dorms

contrast

The campus has an interesting mixture of old and new buildings.

Not surprisingly, there’s a wide variety of academic choices for students with 90+ majors to choose from. Some of the programs have special admissions procedures or information:

  • Engineering: just under 1700 students are enrolled in this college. They come in as undeclared engineers, and then decide at the end of first year which of the 6 specialties they want to do.
  • Management: all business programs, including sports management, hotel management, resource economics.
  • Natural Sciences: this is largest college in terms of majors, students, and grant funding. Integrated and collaborative 40year science program that immerses students in the hands-on process of engaging some of the most pressing global challenges like biomedicine and renewable energy.
  • Public Health and Health Sciences: Public health, nutrition, etc
  • The Honors College enrolls 600 first year students every year. These students have an average of a 4.2 GPA, and SAT of 1345. In the program, classes capped at 24. The university is building a new Commonwealth Honors College Residential Complex which will add 1,500 beds and 9 new classrooms.
  • Nursing is a popular major, but there’s a limit of 84 students in the 1st year class; students can ONLY be admitted as freshmen. There’s no internal application once they’re on campus or transferring from outside the university.
  • UMass Amherst hotelHospitality Management students get hands-on experience working at the Hotel on campus.
  • Students in the Journalism and communications departments have access to studios and specialized rooms for TV broadcasting and production, editing, etc.

UMass Amherst coffeeAcross the disciplines, the university sponsors $180million in research. One of the geology professors takes 8-10 students every year in February to northern Siberia to drill for ice and rock samples. There’s a waiting list . . . to go to northern Siberia in February. That says a lot. UMass ranks 3rd in the country for internship completion: 57% of students completed some sort of placement.

(c) 2012

University of Montana

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA, Missoula (Visited 7/23-24/2012)

~.MSU panarama 1

A panoramic shot of the campus and town from the M Mountain

P1000437

The view of the main building and the oval from “The M Hike” on the hill behind the University

~MSU catapultUM has a classic university feel with big brick buildings and a large oval quad; it’s not only a beautiful campus, but it’s a manageable/ walkable size and it all seems to fit flow. As part of the counselor tour, we stayed in one of the traditional dorms for the first 3 nights. The rooms are a bit on the small side, but certainly livable. However, there was always a rush on the bathrooms which didn’t seem big enough to take care of the needs of the population on the hall. Some of the rooms were traditional doubles, and others were set up in “pods” – a common room with three single rooms off of it. None of the rooms had sinks, but the common rooms of the pods had a small fridge and microwave. None of the residential halls had AC, which students sited as one of the things they would change if they could. Only 2 of the dorms are higher than 4 floors, and all but 1 building are clumped together on one side of campus.

~MSU CSA sign~MSU farm 2Sustainability and locally sourced food is a big deal here. They have a garden on campus, and the food goes to the dining hall. The PEAS farm, about 3 miles away, is used by the university. In addition to 90 CSA shares, they provide 15-20,000 pounds of food for food banks. They offer classes on the farm for the environmental science and agricultural students. The class can be repeated three times: spring, summer, and fall so that students get the full range of what happens on the farm. The man who runs the program wants it to be meaningful experience for the students, and he’s clearly passionate about what he does. The farm is not organic-certified, but it is an organic farm: “we wouldn’t be doing anything differently. We already willingly adhere to all the standards, and becoming certified costs a lot of money and makes me jump through hoops, requiring hours of paperwork that otherwise could be spent on the land.”

One of the biggest issues I saw was that this is a very white campus, although that mimics the town, as well. Native Americans make up the largest minority population, but even that is low – like single digits low. However, there are 500 international students from 75 countries; one of the students on the panel was from Kenya and when asked about winters in Missoula, she said, “if I can survive it, anyone can survive it!”

~MSU main bldg and M

The main building with the M Mountain behind it.

~MSU stadiumMostly, students are really happy here. There’s a lot to do on and off campus. The Grizz-Cat (UM-MSU) rivalry is huge, and the annual football game sells out. One student said “I don’t even like football, but I look forward to the game every year!” Tailgating is huge, and people get really pumped up. School spirit is huge, and they turn out for a lot of games in different sports. They also like the accessibility of skiing and hiking, but say that even non-outdoorsy people fit in and find a lot to do. The movie theater is in walking distance as are restaurants, the local ice cream place, and pubs. Shuttles run frequently. First Friday (open art galleries) is popular. One of the on-campus perks that got a big shout-out is that there are resident IT students on call four nights a week who can be called to help trouble-shoot printer, internet, or computer problems. The biggest issues that students complained about was the parking situation(but that takes on an entirely different meaning here than on a really large campus), and off campus housing can be difficult to find, but not impossible. Most students find things close enough to walk or ride bikes.

~MSU acad bldg 2One of the first events we attended as a group was the Dean’s Panel where 9 Deans gave presentations about their respective colleges.

  • The Arts and Science college is the largest on campus with a lot of collaboration across departments and across colleges. Students can find their niche in the college but have the flexibility to try a lot of things. One of the most unique offerings in this college is Irish Studies which includes language study (the only place west of the Mississippi to offer it), culture, dance, etc. They offer exchanges with various places in Ireland. They also have a nationally recognized Native American Studies program in which student are engaged in the communities in Montana and around the country. Their Environmental Studies program is also nationally ranked, and there are lots of pre-programs (nursing, law, medicine), and advising for these programs is extensive. Their system of professional and faculty advisors for all majors is strong. The university also runs a biological research center on Flathead Lake (the largest freshwater lake west of the Mississippi). Why studying/doing research here, the students can live in university-provided housing.
  • ~MSU acad bldg 1The School of Business offers all the traditional majors which can be found on the website, but two are worth a special mention:
    • The Certificate Program in Entertainment Management (only Vanderbilt and Cornell offer this, as well). 600 students are enrolled in the program which is the most interdisciplinary in the business school. They’ve even been on the cover of Poll Star Magazine.
    • The Entrepreneurship Program which is an Endowed program. Students participate in a statewide competition in which 50-75 business plans get sent in. They pick 15 as semi-finalists who come for 2.5 days to compete for the $10,000 first prize; all of them get to present to investors, so even without winning, they get exposure to potential funding.
  • The College of Technology (soon to be Missoula College, Univ. of Montana) is a 2-year college attached to the main university. Students come from all over the country, and they become part of the university – they live on campus, they use all the facilities – so they get a two-year experience on a four-year Research-1 campus. They have access to smaller classes in 35 programs across five departments (including Applied Computing and Electronics, Culinary Arts, Diesel Welding/Heavy Equipment Operations, and Health Professions). Admission to the College of Tech only requires a HS degree or GED. If they earn 12 credits with a 2.0, they can transfer automatically into UM.
  • The School of Health offers complete accredited programs like Pharmacy (including a 2-4 PharmD program or a 4-3 program if they come in with a BS in a related area like kineseology), PT, Public Health, and Social Work (both BSW and MSW). All accredited. Only programs in the state.
  • In the Visual and Performing Arts College, students can do work in Fine or Visual Arts, Music, Dance, and Theater among other areas; they also have large offering for non-majors. Their $250,000 in scholarship money went largely to those majoring in the school, but some were offered to non-majors if they participated in marching band or for people who play “in-need” instruments. Many study abroad offerings for the majors include Vienna (Art History, Music, etc) and Bali. Dancers performed at Kennedy Center – selected 2/3 years to perform there. Some unique programs to be aware of are the Digital Art/Animation degree and the BFA in Sonic Art (recording engineers, sound in film or live concerts).
  • In Education and Human Sciences, students come in as a major in the particular subject and then apply to pick up licensure. Other majors include Communicative Sciences and Disorders (with a clinic open to the public providing lots of research and hands-on for the students), Clinical and School Psych, Health and Human Performance (athletic training, exercise science, health promotion) and Work physiology and Human Metabolism.
  • The Journalism School is one of the oldest undergrad journalism in the country. Students can major in print, online, photo, and multi-media areas as well as an interdisciplinary major combined with Native Studies. This is one of the schools that require internships, and students regularly get recognized with the Hearst Award. Over $110,000 in scholarships are awarded each year, largely alumni funded
  • ~MSU catapult

    This had been used to haul logs using horsepower; it now sits outside the Forestry Building.

    In the College of Forestry and Conservation, students can mix disciplines such as education, environmental law, and computer applications. It’s important to know that most students in this field will need a Masters for a permanent position. Wildlife Forestry is the largest program in the college (about 40%), and students can focus on terrestrial or water studies. The newest major is Wildland Restoration which deals with reclaiming land, invasive species, and fire control among other things. Students interested in more of a business side can major in Parks Recreation and Tourism Management to become such things as Park Rangers, Land Stewards, or work in a Nature Conservancy. Students can do work over the summer in Fiji, India, Vietnam, and other places, as well as learn winter rescue techniques in Montana and White-Water rescue in Costa Rica.

  • Finally, UM has opened up their Global Research Initiative to all students. When students are accepted to the University, they’re invited to express interest in joining the GRI. From that pool, UM gets a wide span of students and interests (not all business, not all honors, not all female). They look for a cohort that spans the range of majors and credentials. The pilot program took about 235 students in its second year. The program is privately funded, and they will keep it going as long as they can, which they hope will be a long time! Part of the program involves travel and international experiences; when accepted into the program, all US students will be given a passport (if eligible). Every year, the students focus on a specific project or theme:
    • The 1st year revolves around small seminars (examples: Doing the Right Thing, Truth vs. Truthiness) in which they explore a big, enduring question having to do with public health, world poverty, economics, etc.
    • The 2nd year moves into Models of Leadership. Students participate in retreats, lectures, workshops, etc.
    • During the 3rd year, the program will help fund an internship, study abroad, research, or service learning (maybe pay for airfare, etc). Students have to do one of those.
    • The 4th year is the capstone in which students work together in groups of about 15 on one of the big problems. For example: if they’re interested in malaria, they’ll be put into a multi-disciplinary group to problem solve, so they could be working with a biologist, linguist, business major, and education major. The project they complete could be an ad campaign, writing grants, etc.

(c) 2012

Baldwin Wallace University

Baldwin-Wallace College (visited 4/19/12) (now BW University)

“Ok, before we go into the lab, we have a couple rules. First, leave all food and drink outside. Second, do not lick anything in the lab. Everyone good?” Really, you can’t beat a biology professor with a good sense of humor!

BWC 1

The main Conservatory building on campus.

First impressions mean a lot even though we’re told not to judge a book by its cover. BWC made an excellent first impression with its beautiful old stone buildings, immaculate grounds, and tulips and daffodils blooming everywhere. The good news is that the substance of the college did not disappoint! The people at BWC were the only ones on the seven-college counselor-tour who showed off what made them distinct from other schools instead of giving the typical spiel/song-and-dance. A couple other schools gave lip-service to the idea of “we’re not going to tell you that we have great faculty, study abroad options, and research opportunities, because every place you go is going to tell you that” . . . and then they proceeded to tell us about those things. BWC didn’t. Instead, we got to spend time in a lab to interact with students doing independent research, check out innovations in their athletic center and the majors associated with it (such as athletic training, exercise science, sports management and health promotion and management), and then tour their Music Conservatory and learn about programs there. I didn’t even know that they HAD a conservatory; neither did my sister who is a musician, so it’s clearly one of their best-kept secrets! The students go on to do impressive things including performing on Broadway. Seniors graduating with a Musical Theater major participate in a showcase every spring in New York City in front of several directors and producers. This happened about a week before our visit, and within a span of five days, all 13 graduating seniors had signed with agents. (As a comparison, I heard that Michigan had two at that same point in time). An audition is required for entrance into the Conservatory (accredited by the National Association of Music Schools) which offers emphases in performance, pedagogy, jazz, conducting, theory, composing, and sacred music in addition to the unusual major of Music Therapy. (Students also have to be proficient enough on at least one instrument to gain acceptance into the Conservatory if they want to major in Music Therapy).

BWC3Baldwin Wallace actively looks ahead to jobs that experts predict will be available for students in 5-10 years, and then creates majors and learning opportunities for students in order to prepare them. They created 14 new degree programs in the last four years or so. The Physician Assistant program is 1 of 6 in Ohio; they’re a year away from accreditation for a 3-2 program. They excel in Health Sciences and Allied Health majors. They utilize the nearby Cleveland hospitals, some of which are ranked in the top 10 nationally, and they work with industry professionals to develop the new degrees. Their Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing utilizes Concept-based learning; only a couple other programs in NM and NC do this. The Health Sciences are producing impressive results; this year, two students (a junior and a senior) interned with the top pediatric neurosurgeon in the country.

Other majors of note include Digital Media and Design (combining artistry/creativity and technology), their Software engineering degree starting this fall (the only one in the state), Health Care Management, Public Health (which started this fall; 29 students are already enrolled), and Recreation Sport Sciences.

BWC4One of their major goals across all majors is to create a practice-based education. Most of the faculty members come to BW from the fields in which they teach allowing them to provide practical, real examples of how the theory and knowledge they teach translates into the real world. Almost every student completes some sort of “experiential education” experience through internships, study abroad, and other types of programs. The school has 52 articulated agreements for study abroad with options for others if students find a different program they’re interested in. Students must complete a minor here in order to broaden their educational field.

Although this is a Methodist-affiliated college, it does not feel at all religious. Although we didn’t get a full tour of the school, I’m not sure they even have a chapel; if they do, it’s not obvious in the main part of campus. However, the current president is only one of two in the history of the institution who is a non-Methodist, non-pastor president; he was also only one of two college Presidents on the tour to take the time to talk to us (Otterbein’s president was the other).

BWC is a Test Optional school; applicants have the option to turn in graded paper instead of test scores. They are also committed to affordability; there have been very small tuition increases in the last several years, the lowest in their peer-group. The entire bill comes to $35,000 a year including all the fees (tech, health, etc.), although the tuition at the conservatory is higher than the rest of campus because of the private lessons. The best thing – and the first time I’ve heard of a school doing this – has to do with the Meal Plan: students only get charged for what they use. If they don’t use it, BWC will give it back!

This incoming freshmen class (fall of 2012) can sign up for a 4-year graduation guarantee. BWC has been intentional about getting students out in four years, and they’re putting their money where their mouth is. They have a mapped-out four-year plan so students can stay on track. It is a completely voluntary program and basically requires that the students do common sense things such as meet with their advisor regularly and declare a major within two years as well as attend seminars and sign a waiver that will release information to the parents (if they drop a course, if they aren’t doing well in class, etc). If they do everything they need to do but can’t graduate within 4 years, the 5th year’s tuition is free.

BWC 2

One of the dorms with a sand volleyball court in front.

Students must live on campus for freshmen and sophomores years unless they are within a certain radius of campus and living with family. About 80% of freshman and sophomores live on campus and about 2/3 of the total undergraduates are on campus – that’s almost 2,000 residents on campus. Freshman can have cars on campus.

I was left with the good impressions of BW that I started with and I would definitely recommend it to my students. It has the typical smallish-college feel but with a lot of options and innovative programs that allows students to take advantage of a lot. The campus is comfortable and students are friendly. A former student of one of the counselors had joined us at lunch so we got yet another student’s perspective; he loves the college and all that he can do there.

(c) 2012

Kent State University

Kent State University (visited 4/16/12)

Kent State 1

The main plaza.

I admit it: I was really looking forward to seeing this university because of the historical significance of it. I was a little disappointed to see the “raggedy” edges of campus driving in, but the edges of campus are never what the schools want to show off. Campus was well kept up even though some of the buildings were clearly older. However, there is a ton of building going on, including several new dorms. I liked the main part of campus, but it felt very much like a generic campus. While nothing was wrong with the physical campus, little stood out; one thing that did was the “promenade,” a long, wide, brick-lined walkway cutting through a main part of campus. Our tour guide told us of several events held there, including Welcome Week events and showcases of clubs. It was one of the main pedestrian thoroughfares on campus, and it was well used. Students were out and about, but it was not a hang-out; rather, it was simply an easy way to get from one place to another. People did hang out in the new beautiful Union; there were several food options, a large spiral staircase in the middle of the lobby, meeting rooms, the bookstore, and lots of student-services offices all in the building which was great. Students definitely hung out there, but there was also a lot of foot-traffic of students grabbing food or taking care of things between classes.

Kent State 2

One of the memorials to the shooting victims.

During the tour, we did get to see the Kent State Shootings Memorials. There is a large memorial sculpture in addition to smaller memorials to each student in the location where he or she was shot; they have also preserved the bullet-hole left in a third sculpture. Someone had drawn a peace symbol around the hole. During a core class, all the students at KSU learn about the history leading up to (and what happened after) the campus shootings.

About 16% of the 21,000 undergrads are from out-of-state. They have the University Award scholarship specifically for out-of-state students; this covers ½ of the out-of-state tuition surcharge. To be eligible, applicants need a 2.5 GPA and at least a 21 on the ACT. The Presidential Scholarship is given to out-of-state and underrepresented students with at least a 3.25 GPA. Eligibility for the Honors Program is determined automatically during the application process; students in the honors program can register for special classes, have access to special study abroad programs, and live in the Honors Living Learning Community, among other benefits.

KSU Res Halls house between 56 and 550 students each. Currently they have 12 Living-Learning Communities ranging in interests from Entrepreneurship or Business to Public Health or Nursing to the International Village Experience; the students who live there tend to have higher GPAs. Students from outside commuting distance must live on campus for their first two years; about 80% of freshman and sophomores are on campus. There are 5 dorms that are specifically designated for the “First Year Experience; other housing options are often mixed levels and are assigned by lottery. The six newest dorms, Centennial Courts A-F (very original names!) are beautiful and spacious; upperclassmen snatch them up quickly which isn’t a surprise. I really liked Kent’s “dorm room showcase” in which they have 4 different model dorm rooms open to visitors and students who might not have seen the set-ups in different locations. Although some other people rolled their eyes a bit – “how many dorm rooms do we need to see?” – this is the only university I’ve ever visited that showed us more than one type of room. Although it’s nice to see a typical freshman dorm room (usually those are the worst, smallest, and/or oldest and students can only move up from there), I liked seeing how the different dorms were set up, particularly without having to tromp through several buildings!

Students can choose from 280 majors in 8 different colleges. New programs include Digital Science (including computer design, animation, and game design) and Public Health; fashion design and architecture are strong, hands-on programs. The two most unusual majors are Crafts (ceramics, glass, jewelry and metals, and textiles) and Air Traffic Control which falls under their Aeronautics Technology department. Students graduating with this major go to Oklahoma after graduation for their final 3 months of training and exams before becoming fully licensed. Within that department, they can also focus on Aeronautical systems, aviation management, and flight technology.

Retention rate is in the 75-78% range. The university is working on improving that, through such programs as the First Year Experience and by instituting an “Early Alert” program for students who are floundering in academics. Resident Directors are also told at mid-terms about students in their dorms who are having trouble so there is some tag-teaming between the academic and residential side. Students we spoke to spoke highly of the activities on campus – there are activities calendars posted listing things to on and off campus. Buses into downtown Kent are free and frequent. Buses into Cleveland cost only $5, so a lot of students take advantage of that for sporting events, concerts, and other things. The students we spoke to, although maybe not as gushing as students from other schools, were very positive about their experiences. Almost no complaints came up, even when asked directly what they would like to improve about the school. This confirmed the feeling I had already developed about Kent: it’s a solid school with good resources, good programs, and a good social life. The community feel perhaps is not as strong as I had seen on a few other campuses, but students genuinely seemed to like the school and each other. The students who thrived there were good students who took advantage of the variety of opportunities in and out of the classroom. On the whole slightly more outdoorsy than maybe some other student bodies although I can’t put my finger on why this seems to be the case. Kent is clearly an excellent place for the right student, especially for those looking at some of the unusual majors, but it’s not one I would gush over to a lot of students – but I also wouldn’t discourage anyone; I think it’s strong in a lot of ways but without anything to particularly distinguish it from other places.

(c) 2012

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