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Towson University (Take 2)

Towson University (visited 4/16/19) (click HERE to see notes and pictures from my first visit on 9/30/16).

We asked the students to tell us about something that is uniquely Towson:

  • There are so many different places to go like Glen Woods or Freedom Square.
  • “The res halls are great. I hadn’t seen such diverse housing options at other places I toured.” Housing is guaranteed for 4 years in the Honors College, 2 years otherwise.
  • “Our health center is really great.”
  • It’s a great location – there’s downtown Baltimore and “uptown” Towson with shops and restaurants and the cinema.

This is the 2nd largest and fastest growing state school in Maryland. “There’s a huge momentum on campus” with an investment of $1.7B in real estate and a recently built new Science complex. However, they still keep classes at reasonable sizes with 24 students in an average class. There are a couple lecture halls with 125 seats, a couple more with 90. Those are the largest spaces on campus so no class can ever have more than that number of students. Some of their more unusual majors include Earth-Space Science, Metropolitan Studies, Deaf Studies, Dance Performance and Choreography, Bioinformatics, and Gerontology.

Students interested in merit scholarships must apply by 12/1 Early Action for consideration. They do NOT take Common or Coalition Apps. The $45 application fee can be waived in a variety of ways: College Board/SAT, College Bound, Baltimore City/County Top 10%, Alumni Admissions Nomination, Military Service, or Financial Hardship. The Personal Essay is an original TU Prompt: next year, it’ll be “Topic of your Choice” with suggestions. They’ve also changed requirements so interested students can use the same essay as their Honors College App.

The Honors College (open to incoming and enrolled students in any major within the first two years of study) enrolls approximately 700 students with 50 majors represented. Class sizes max out at 20. When interested students apply to Towson, they’ll check “yes” for honors on the application. This will trigger a prompt for the Honors Essay which is then used for both admission to Towson and for the Honors College. Applicants who click “no” will only write the essay for admissions (a different prompt). Decisions for Honors are done AFTER admission to the university; all honors decisions are sent out at once in February. Towson very intentionally builds community within the Honors Program with housing and Co-curricular programs run by students such as First Day Coff-Ay, Generation Jeopardy, First-Year Flapjacks, Smoothie Saturday, and Honors Helping Hands. One of the student panelists was in the honors program and said that she was a little apprehensive going in, but “Classes are seminar style. They’re a collaboration. They aren’t scary and they aren’t like AP classes.”

Towson offers a Freshman Transition Program which is a collaboration between CCBC and TU. This is an invitation-only program to selected freshman applicants. Usually 175-200 are in the program any given year. Students take Community College courses taught by CCBC faculty on TU’s campus in the late afternoon and evening. However, they are treated like full TU students with the exception that they cannot participate in intercollegiate or club sports. A major benefit is that they pay CCBC tuition and fees (cheaper than TU tuition) but TU Room & Board. If they hit certain criteria in the first semester, they can then segue directly into being a fully enrolled TU student in the 2nd semester (about 80-90%). If not, they have another chance in 2nd semester to meet that criteria. Students are assigned to an FTP advisor to help them through the process..

© 2019

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Towson University

TOWSON UNIVERSITY (visited 9/30/16) (Click HERE for updates and more information from my visit on 4/16/19)

towson-bball-field

Baseball Field and campus buildings

As the second largest university in the Maryland system, I expected more of a state-school feel with large somewhat sterile buildings. I should know better. There are definitely parts of campus that fit this description: parking garages, plain (even outdated, not attractive) concrete buildings. The worst of these, an imposing concrete tower, had been a dorm until they closed it with the intent to knock it down, making way for an updated building.

towson-cola

College of Liberal Arts building

That being said, there are gorgeous parts of campus with historic and new buildings. Some of the newest buildings are in West Village, new residential units with Hotel-Style (bathrooms in each room; these rooms cost $600 more per semester), apartments, suites, and more. West Village Commons has a buffet-style dining hall, grab-and-go eateries, meeting rooms, and a group exercise room. There’s also a new union under construction in the middle of campus. In addition to the 2nd of 3 buffet-style dining halls and more meeting space, this will house an American Ninja Warrior Course. The new, LEED-certified Liberal Arts Building might look familiar to House of Cards fans; an episode was filmed inside.

towson-towersI went on tour with several families and 2 tour guides, 1 of whom was training. Because of this, I overheard things that they’re supposed to include on tours: the already-trained tour guide said (either not knowing or not caring that he was saying this within earshot), “I don’t usually bother telling people about that place down there because how many people care? But if you don’t say it on your evaluation, you’ll fail.” He was incredibly hard to get “off script” during the tour; sometimes he would give perfunctory answers and/or say, “We’ll get to that later.” They’re clearly trained to only talk about certain things at certain times. For example, I asked when the last time he heard of anyone using the blue lights. His answer: “We’re 5 years crime free. We’ll talk about security later.” That’s great but didn’t answer the question.

towson-4The guide-in-training was more personable, willing to answer questions, and give insight into what it was like to be a student. She walked some of us across campus to where we had parked (the tour ends at the bookstore – go figure! – nowhere near where we parked and started the tour!). During those 10 minutes, I learned more about the student experience than during the entire 2-hour tour. She picked Towson over another Maryland school because of its diversity. “I see a lot more people like me here, and I have friends from all over, of many different races, different religions. It feels more like the real world.” She is thrilled with the academic offerings, the social life, the location, and pretty much everything here. She didn’t have much she’d want to change other than the parking situation. Freshman are no longer allowed to have cars on campus; parking on campus costs “$300-something per semester. It’s a lot.”

towson-stevens-hall

Stevens Hall, the iconic building that shows up on several of the marketing materials for the university.

Admission is selective but not overwhelmingly so: mid-range ACT scores are 21-26 (average of 23), and with the new SAT, they’re expecting at least a 1000 (CR&M). They use their own online application with a personal statement. “We want to know your story: Who are you, and what can you contribute to the Towson community?” said the admissions rep. “Make it as close to 500 words as you can get.” Applicants can expect an answer within 3-6 weeks. They will start releasing decisions in November and keep going until the class is full. However, students who want a guaranteed review for scholarships should apply by December 1.

towson-mascot

Towson’s  mascot

The Honors College application is built into the regular application, needing a 3.6 to be considered. If you indicate that you’re interested, an additional writing prompt pops up. The HC operates like its own college. Students must earn 24 Honors credits, including 9 seminar and 6 thesis credits. Honors students are guaranteed premium housing without the additional cost, $1000-3000 additional scholarship, and priority registration (right after the athletes and students with accommodations).

towson-dorms-2

West Commons dorm buildings

Housing is guaranteed for Freshmen. There are a couple dorms without AC that apparently have the highest retention rate at the university. The tour guide suggested it was because there was a real community feel because “everyone leaves their doors open for the breeze.” Residential freshmen must get a weekly meal plan and “use it or lose it” (it doesn’t roll over). Upperclassmen and commuters can choose a Block Plan with a set number of meals per semester.

towson-psych-bldg

Part of the academic side of campus

Towson requires 14 core classes. No classes are taught by GAs or TAs which is wonderful for a school this size. All freshmen get a FYE advisor (in their major if they’ve declared one, otherwise they’re assigned at random); they get a new permanent advisor as a sophomore. Average classes sizes over around 24-30. The tour guide said that “classes are maxed at 35” but this is clearly not the case. The tour guides said that they’ve had classes of about 100 students (Microbiology and Intro to Psych); their smallest ranged from 7 (a seminar class) and 20 (ASL).

towson-enviro-cntr

Part of the Environmental Center

They have a great, albeit small Environmental Center on campus with 121 indigenous plant species. There’s a pedestrian walkway over part of this as well as outdoor classrooms, picnic tables, benches, etc. Freedom Square, surrounded by academic buildings, is a favorite hangout for many students. There are 2 chalkboards for students to write comments, put up ads for campus events, etc. There are plenty of benches and other places for students to congregate.

There are several “Screened” majors. Students interested in these come in as “pre-____”, take preliminary classes, and apply to the major once they’re here. Some of these include:

towson-cafe-enactus

Cafe Enactus was a “senior thesis” by a business Honors student in the class of 2015.

Other programs of note include:

Students in all programs can study abroad for 2 weeks to 2 years, or they can participate in the US Exchange program to study at another university for a period of time.

© 2016

 

McDaniel College

McDaniel College, Westminster, MD (visited 1/25/12)

Listed in Loren Pope’s Colleges that Change Lives, this beautiful campus is about an hour north of DC. Until about 10 years ago, this was Western Maryland College, a bit confusing since it’s not in the western part of the state: it was originally named after the railroad that went through town. McDaniel is the name of a former college president who was well loved and had given a great deal of time to the students. The campus, where most of the 1,600 undergrads live, has a traditional college campus feel: lots of older (but well maintained) brick buildings, slightly rolling hills, etc. The campus is compact; walking from one end to the other takes about 10 minutes.

I really liked some of their unusual majors such as American Sign Language/ Deaf Studies, Graphic Design, or Athletic Training/ Exercise Science and Physiology. Students can also self-design majors such as Sports Journalism. The college offers 5-Year BA/MS programs in Counselor Education, Gerontology, Human Services Management, and 3 areas of education. The January Term is great; I wish I had been able to take some of the classes they offer, particularly some of the study-abroad options: art/photography classes in a variety of places, marine biology in the Bahamas, investigating the Dracula legends in Romania, working with deaf children in the Dominican Republic.

My tour guide was an upperclassman from Baltimore who originally had wanted a bigger, more urban school, but visited and fell in love with the campus. She doesn’t regret coming at all, but when I asked what she would change if she could, the only thing she would change is the location. She loves the people, the campus, and the education, but doesn’t like that so much around campus closes down at 10; one restaurant stays open until 2, but it’s a 15 minute walk away – doable, but not something they do every day.

(c) 2012

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