campus encounters

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Archive for the tag “Criminal Justice”

Adrian College

Adrian College (visited 1/31/15)

~Adrian mall

The “mall”

I had high hopes for Adrian; I had heard the name and knew the basics so I was curious to find out more. I was a little concerned about the retention rate; unfortunately my visit didn’t entirely alleviate my fears in that realm. However, I really liked the students I spoke to, the people in the admission office, and the campus. Athletes, B to B+ students, and students who will get involved and who want small classes will thrive at Adrian.

~Adrian 1~Adrian auditoriumMy tour guide was surprised at how much he loved Adrian. “I really had wanted to go to Notre Dame but didn’t get in. I got into Michigan, had put down my deposit, had a roommate picked out – but then came back here to visit. I changed my mind that day and deposited.” His parents both went to Adrian and were thrilled that he chose to go – and he got a legacy scholarship which helps! People he knows who have left did so for a variety of reasons: some wanted to be closer to home, one joined the army, some thought college wasn’t for them. A lot of football players were recruited from Florida and hated the winters in Michigan.

~Adrian mural

Mural outside the Student Center

fabric samples for Interior Design students

fabric samples for Interior Design students

The campus is nice, even in the middle of winter. Every year, they hold a Creativity Awards contest. The winner gets $10,000 to improve campus. So far winners included a large mural outside the student center, bike racks/bike share, International Walkway with things written in multiple languages, etc. “During the year, there’s something like 1000 flower baskets,” said the tour guide. “I wish you could see it then. All the art on campus is student-created. They have an extensive art program with a dance studio, photo labs, pre-architecture, and Interior Design. One studio has 90 styles of lighting for the architecture students! Music is also big here, and the city of Adrian has a symphony that uses the college’s theater.

Adrian Thinker

The Thinker in front of the Theater

~Adrian stud centr 2

The new student center; study boxes are on the upper left

The oldest building on campus, once a stop on the Underground Railroad, is a three-story stone building now used as the theatre. They do a great job refurbishing buildings for updated purposes. The student center is the old gym. They spectator boxes are now study boxes that are open 24/7. The Salon in the basement advertises “nails, hair, and tanning.” The Starbucks in the first floor takes flex bucks.

About 20% of the students go Greek. “There are a lot of Greeks in Admissions. They tend to be most involved in campus life. They love the school.”

Adrian baseball practice

Baseball practice

Almost 2/3 of the students are athletes and there’s a lot of support for the teams. There was a cheer competition in the gym as we went through around 10am on a Saturday. Several girls had pulled exercise bikes over outside the glass doors to watch as they worked out. Adrian’s hockey rink is the only one in the area, so community teams use it as well. A Community Team was using it that morning. 200 Adrian students play hockey on one of 6 teams (4 men, 2 women). They have DI club teams for both men and women; varsity is DIII. They also have synchronized skating and figure skating. Hope is the big rival. They’re quadrupling the size of the weight room (it’s currently tiny).

~Adrian quad

Quad and the library

A popular study area in the Science Building

A popular study area in the Science Building

The tour guide’s largest class was 30 in his Intro to Sociology class. Smallest were 6 (Freshman Writing) and 3 (upper level Econ). “They’re getting rid of the Econ major, so I’m taking a lot of upper level classes and individucal studies so I can finish before they phase it out.” He took Kitchen Chemistry – they did a lot of baking to experiment with how different things influenced the outcome; they ate an fruit that blocked most taste receptors and ate different foods before and after to test this; worked with yeast, etc. He loved his Movies and Culture class in which they discussed social aspects of films starting back in the 30s.

~Adrian dorms

The convenience store on campus with dorms in the background

There are lots of housing options. The freshman dorms are traditional style and old. “I think they’re the same buildings my parents lived in when they were here.” However, after first year, students can live in dorms, apartments, one of 24 theme houses (which can be as small as 4 students), themed houses, fraternities, etc. There are also plenty of flexible meal options. One style is Block Style (students get a certain number of swipes per semester which can be used back-to-back if they want to swipe in a guest). Another style is the 14- or 18-meal-per-week (which can be used once every 4 hours). “The quality of the food is fine but it gets boring.”

~Adrian chapel interior

Chapel

This started as a Methodist school but is now loosely affiliated at best. My tour guide was a Methodist and will go downtown to services; Catholic students often go over to Siena Heights University which is a few miles down the road. There’s a non-denominational service on Wednesdays in which a religion student will give the sermon. Students can bring lunch to chapel.

~Adrian music wing

The music wing: offices and practice rooms.

Their Accounting and Business program is strong with 11 concentrations to choose from including Event & Facilities Management, Health Care Management, Sports Management, and Fashion Merchandising. The Director of Entrepreneurship brought Dominos and Little Ceasars pizza to Israel before he started to teach. Criminal Justice, Social Work, and Art History are also worth noting.

The college offers several Internal Masters (open only to Adrian students). Several students will use the Athletic Training and Industrial Chemistry Masters as a gateway to Med School. 98% of students get placed in med schools or in to the health field upon graduation.

(c) 2015

Maryville University

Maryville University (Visited 4/11/13)

Maryville 1

One of the main buildings on campus.

I didn’t even know that Maryville University existed before I got invited to the Counselor Fly-In, but over the course of this busy day-and-a-half program, I learned a lot. This university on the outskirts of St. Louis is a good choice for certain students, particularly the solid-B students looking to go into Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, or Nursing since these are direct entry programs.

Maryfille 4

Springtime on campus

The university is located directly off the highway among business complexes. We exited the highway and pulled quickly into campus with no stores to be seen; I asked the admissions rep if there was something on the other side of campus – cafes, bookstores, anything; there’s not. They are tucked squarely among businesses, so they a have limited area in which to grow. The campus itself, luckily, opens up once you’re on it. There are green spaces; flowers and trees were in bloom. However, even with that, the campus feels a bit industrial, for lack of a better word. Although they had some pretty buildings and the quads were nice, there was just something – plain? – about campus. Also, because there’s nothing within walking distance for students, everyone can have cars on campus, and the school offers shuttles to Target, Walmart, and other places, but only for the first few weeks of the school year since people stop using it after about a month. A city bus stops next to campus which runs to the light rail or all the way downtown. Light rail costs about $4 and takes about 15 minutes to downtown. We asked students what it was like without anything in walking distance, and mostly they shrugged: “It’s easy enough to get around because so many people commute (only 650 of the 2,000 traditional undergrads live on campus). You always know people with cars, and the shuttle is easy.” They said that there’s a lot to do off campus and that “lots of things are free.” They also tend to do things at the other schools in town (particularly WashU and SLU).Maryville quad

Some of the majors impressed me because of their uniqueness or because of particular strengths:

  • Criminal Justice and Criminology is one major. Students can spend a semester at the police academy and get 13 credits towards their BA! I don’t know of another school that does that.

    Maryville 2

    The first floor of the library

  • Their Sports Business Management program is sponsored by Rawlings, one of the businesses next to campus. Rawlings (which makes football and baseball equipment) offers several internship opportunities, as do the sports teams in St. Louis.
  • Health Sciences are generally good. They’re deliberately interdisciplinary and community-focused. “Be ready to be engaged” through simulation labs, clients from the city who come in for on-site clinicals, and even international clinical experiences such as with Healing Hands Foundation in Guatemala. Students complete 275,000 clinical hours annually.
    • They have direct-entry Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Nursing. One student panelist chose Maryville for the nursing, which she described as “rigorous. It definitely pushes me.” OT is a direct-to-Masters program (no Bachelors along the way). PT students earn a BS in Health Sciences and then do 3 more years to earn the DPT. OT students have a 94% passing rate on the boards; PT has 100%
    • Rehab Services is a bachelors program in which students complete coursework and field experiences, looking at societal needs, health care policy, legal mandates, access to resources, and how societal perspectives impact perspectives on disability.
    • Students registered in the Pre-Med track can do a Sophomore Review. They submit a resume and letter, then complete a mock interview. The panel will grill them. After, they write a letter explaining what the student did well and what to work on. 100% of those kids who are doing everything right get into med school.
    • One student panelist was taking Gross Anatomy as a sophomore and was heading there right after the panel. “We’re dissecting a human heart today. We’re actually taking it out of the cadaver. It’s a bit terrifying.”
    • The Education Department is intense; the students have more extensive and intensive school placements than many other colleges.
      • Freshmen visit seven schools (all levels, urban and suburban); Sophomores are in schools two days/week for a year and complete the Street Project as a scheduled, credit-bearing class; Juniors spend two half-days and one full day/week for a year (lots of teaching, case studies); Seniors see school begin in August, then two days/week until student teaching.
      • The Street Project: small groups are assigned a street that radiates from downtown out into the suburbs. They have to drive the street at least 3 times, noting communities, economics, cultures, etc. They have to attend a cultural event, research the history, visit a school, look at finances of schools, interview people, etc.
      • The Legal Studies major is approved by American Bar Association. Ninety-five percent of grads are employed at graduation, and 95% of those who want to go to law school are accepted.
      • The Forensic Science Professor came to talk to us in a tie-dyed lab coat. The program is three years old; he’s working on getting accreditation (but need to have a graduate first). Students have to be prepared to work from the initial crime through trial. They’re ready to teach, be police officers, do lab work, and more. “If I haven’t taught them how to think for themselves, I’ve failed.”
        • Two students said that Criminal Investigations/From Murder to Trial was their favorite class. A crime scene is set up (which is so realistic that they’ve had to tell other students that it’s not a real scene) and students do the CSI and take it to trial. Students in this class can get credit for a lab class, Criminal Justice, or Legal Studies.
        • Communications: Students can specialize in PR, Marketing, Advertising, Social Media, and more. Some of the courses include: Intro to New and Social Media, Health Communication, Writing for PR, Strategic Communications Campaigns, News Writing and Editing. The department pushes these students to complete at least 2 or 3 internships, some as early as freshmen year.
        • Music Therapy students are prepared to work in Gerontology, Physical Rehab, Special Ed, pediatrics, psychiatry, Hospice Care, and more. Students in this major often participate in “Kids Rock Cancer.”

          Maryville 3

          The Design “library”

        • They have partnered up with WashU and others for a dual-degree Engineering program.
        • Their hands-on Interior Design, Interactive Design, Graphic Design, and similar programs are well-funded and very hands-on. The Arts building has impressive studios; they can even take Metals and Jewelry classes.. We got to see an end-of-year display that students were putting together for an evening open-house/job fair that brings employers in to see final projects.
Maryville 5

The lobby of the newest dorm, a converted hotel, which houses 240 students.

Maryville bridgeMaryville pulls about 25% of their students from out of state, particularly from Illinois (right across the river) and California (it helps that they have a regional rep who lives out there). One of the students on the panel said that Maryville was more affordable than the California schools. They love the small school and small classes because they can get involved, get to know people, and get help when they need it. Most students who come from out of town can live on campus if they want to, but for those who choose to live off campus, it’s relatively easy to find housing, and the commuter students said that it’s easy to get involved with a Commuter Connection group to help them link into campus. The university would like to make this more of a residential campus. They recently added 240 beds by buying a hotel located directly across the street and converting it to a dorm; this is highly sought after because of the individual bathrooms. They would like to build more dorm space, but physical space is an issue since they can’t physically expand the campus.

Maryville picnicOne of the complaints on campus is that events aren’t always well attended. “You don’t’ get that 3000 person crowd.” The school has a ways to go to develop a vibrant, active, residential atmosphere, although they look out for students in a variety of ways, including some early intervention programs to make sure that kids don’t fall in the cracks, academically or socially. However, a lot of services seem to be “farmed out.” For example, there’s no Greek life, but it’s a “Greek friendly campus” and they’ll work with organizations from other places city-wide.

(c) 2013

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