campus encounters

"Get the first-hand scoop about colleges and universities"

Archive for the tag “Arts Management”

Chatham University

Chatham University (visited 5/26/16)

~Chatham sign and chapelChatham is a hidden gem of a school located in a beautiful residential part of western Pittsburgh. Until recently, this was a women’s college; in the 2015-16 school year, they brought in their first males to the freshman class. “The upperclassmen tended to be more upset about this. I knew coming in that it was a distinct possibility that they would go coed so I was ready for it,” said our tour guide, a rising-senior nursing student staffing the front desk.

~Chatham dorm 1

One of the Residence Halls

All residence halls (they aren’t called dorms) are converted mansions. Most of them have some sort of theme such as Sustainable Living or Global Scholars. Partly in keeping with their Women’s College heritage and partly because they’re still heavily skewed in terms of gender, there are all-female dorms available. Upperclassmen have the option of living in 3-person apartments just off campus on Fifth Avenue that are open to upperclassmen. Our tour guide lives there and loves that it’s given her an added level of independence. She’s still in campus housing but gets a taste of being on her own.

~Chatham Mellon House 3

The back of the Mellon summer residence house.

There are other historical, beautiful buildings on campus in addition to the residence halls. The Mellon House was Andrew Mellon’s summer residence, complete with an indoor pool and a bowling alley in the basement (the Pool area has since been converted to the Board Room.) The first floor has all the original rooms, including fireplaces, and “is a great place to study. There are usually very few people here so it’s quiet.” The university also incorporates as much of the old into the new, when possible. The science center renovated an old academic building and the added around it in order to keep some of the history and original flavor.

~Chatham Statue 2Chatham sets students up for success, starting with providing each student with a free MacBook plus 1 free replacement while they’re at Chatham. Additionally, students all get a $1,200 study abroad voucher which can be used for anything from a 1-week study-trip associated with a class to a full year of study abroad. “It doesn’t cover everything, but at the very least, it pays for the airfare!” said the tour guide.

~Chatham pond 2Classes, of course, are small: our tour guide’s largest class has had 31 students “which is larger than normal. The professor let extra students into the class.” Her smallest class, Anatomy Lab 2, had 10 students.

~Chatham dormsSustainability is a big part of campus and mission. They’re proud of the fact that one of their most famous alumna is Rachel Carson (author of Silver Spring). Their newest addition to the school, the Eden Hall Campus, is located about 45 minutes north of Pittsburgh. Housing the Falk School of Sustainability, it opened in 2010. Students can earn a BSUS or MSUS (Bachelor/ Master of Sustainability), and MA in Food Studies, or a combined MBA with either of the Master’s degrees. Many of the Sustainability undergraduates live on the Eden Hall Campus, and the food grown there is used in the dining hall of both campuses, which is pretty cool. However, it’s not just these students who work on sustainability projects. A team of 3 Chatham chemistry students just won the $5000 CleanTech University Prize at Carnegie Mellon for their work on a new compressor lubricant for HVAC systems.

~Chatham sci bldg

The science building: the old section is on the left with the new, modern portion built around it.

Health Sciences are worth noting. Most impressive is that they have a cadaver lab on campus! This is really unusual for a school this size, and it gives their undergrads a real leg-up when it comes to medical or graduate school. Two unusual majors in the health sciences are Integrative Health Studies and Interdisciplinary Health Science (with a concentration in Bio, Exercise Science, or Psychology). Nursing is particularly strong. Their Pathways to Nursing Major pairs students up with UPMC Shadyside School of Nursing. Our tour guide is in this program. She did her first year of classes on campus, spent 2 years split between the two campuses, and will finish her clinicals and classes at Chatham for her senior year. She loves the experiences she has, and she wouldn’t do this any other way. “I love Chatham and being part of the community, but I also love meeting all the other people at Shadyside. Even when I’m there, I know I am coming home to Chatham in the evenings and have all my friends here.”

~Chatham coffee shop

The student-run coffee shop

The Business program is also strong. We spoke with a business professor who was in the hall of one of the academic buildings; she was a delight to talk to – very enthusiastic and helpful. I can only imagine what she’s like in the classroom! She told us about the Center for Women Entrepreneurs on campus as well as the variety of programs. For such a small campus, there’s a wide range of business degrees including Social Services Administration, Arts Management, Management Info Systems, International Business, and Healthcare and Business Management in addition to the more common majors (general business, accounting, general management, etc).

~Chatham stairsMore importantly, students have the opportunity to participate in an Integrated Degree Program in the health sciences, business, sustainability, and the arts. The GPA requirement is higher in the health sciences (3.5) compared to the others (3.25). There are also specific ACT or SAT minimums and required prep work in high school classes. Collaborative programs with other universities allow students to complete degrees in Music Education, Teacher Training, and Physics (all with Carnegie Mellon), 3+4 law degrees with Duquesne (PA) or Stetson University (FL), and 4+1 Bachelors/Masters programs in various management programs, also at Carnegie Mellon.

© 2016

Advertisements

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (visited 7/28/15)

Once known as North Adams State, this 1800-student college is nestled in the small but bustling town of North Adams in the Berkshires. The students rave about town: “There’s so much to do! Mass MoCA is free, the ice rink is free on Tuesdays, there are movies, pubs, restaurants. We saw Lady Gaga last week at Tanglewood [about 45 minutes away]. If we want to get out of town, there’s any outdoor activity you can think of.”

√MCLA acad bldg 1Campus architecture ranges from beautiful old houses to almost-ugly 60’s and 70s buildings to a brand-new environmentally friendly science center that has solar panels and a wind turbine on top. Many of the central buildings are connected or only steps apart. For example, one of the gyms and the theater are both attached to the student center. Campus is not huge: “You can get across it in about 5 minutes.”

√MCLA quadEnglish, Business, and Psychology are some of the biggest majors, and (not surprisingly given its history as a Normal College), Education is strong. They also have Arts Management, unusual for a school of this size. MCLA offers 2 “Jump Start” summer programs. The first is a week-long leadership initiative for approximately 30 students each year called LEAD (Leadership, Education, Action, and Development). The Second is STEM Academy which takes about 16-20 students.

√MCLA outdoor class

Outdoor classroom

The tour guide could not say enough about the teachers. “I know it sounds really cliché, but they do care.” This is one thing that really surprised her about MCLA. She had been told in high school that college professors wouldn’t care about how she did, and yet the do. She went on to say that even the librarians care about the students. One of the traditions she loves is that at the end of each semester during finals, they order food for students and will go through the library to tell them that the food has arrived so the kids can take a break.

New tower dorms

New tower dorms

Townhouses on campus

Townhouses on campus

MCLA has a 3-year on-campus residency requirement, and 95% of traditional aged students live on campus. Dorms range from traditional hall-style double rooms to suites and townhouses, both of which have singles and double bedrooms and which can be coed by suite. Townhouses have full kitchens and house only upperclassmen (MCLA defines this as sophomore and up). The new towers have suites which will usually have 4 doubles and a single.

√MCLA gates

The infamous gates

Another popular tradition/superstition revolves around the gates. At the beginning of the year, freshman will enter the gates from the main road, meet the president and their peers, and then have a party. The seniors will walk out of the gates at graduation. Rumor has it that walking between the gates before then means they won’t graduate – at least on time. “I know someone who walked through them accidentally. He graduated a semester late. I like to think it’s because it wasn’t intentional . . . otherwise he’d never get out of here!”

√MCLA sci cntr 2

Science Center

The tour guide’s largest class was Intro to Bio with 45 students. “We met for 2 hours twice a week. Usually we’d have a lecture for half and a lab for half.” Her smallest, College Writing 2, had 8 “which is weird because that’s a core class.” Her favorite has been Behavioral Analysis because the professor would tell them real stories from the field.

In terms of admissions, MCLA is a state school so they generally have to follow the Department of Education regulations which include 4 units of math, one of which has to be taken in the senior year. “We have a tiny bit of wiggle room to admit a few students to don’t immediately meet the requirements but who we think will be successful,” said a rep. Usually this is saved for out-of-state students who may have graduated under other requirements. They will superscore both the ACT and the SAT.

√MCLA walkwayVery few students come from out-of-state: probably only about 10% come from outside of MA or the Capital Region of NY (technically OOS, but only an hour away – closer than Boston). These students make up about another 10% of the student body. Transportation can be a little bit of an issue, but certainly doable. “We have a student from Colorado who just grabs a ride with a friend to Albany and gets a plane from there.” There’s also a bus that will stop at Williams College only a few miles down the road. Amtrak also goes through Pittsfield which is about 25-30 miles away.

“Students who are looking for a small liberal-arts, New England campus in a great cultural center and who have a sense of community service or activism will do really well here,” said the rep.

(c) 2015

Southern Methodist University

SMU (visited 3/2/15)

~SMU fountain~SMU muslim group displayContrary to what people may believe, “you don’t have to be either Southern or Methodist to go here.” The school is actively fighting the rich, white, preppy stereotype, and the student population is “relatively diverse” and improving every year. Although 40% of students are from Texas, “we make an effort to have students from everywhere,” said the director of admissions. They’re looking for a balance between in and out of state, not so easy with a state the size of Texas. Religiously, “we have all faiths (including Muslim, Jewish, and Buddhist) and no faith.”

~SMU walkway 2SMU is a much larger campus than many of us expected but still easily walkable. They’ve kept the same beautiful architecture as they’ve expanded. Although campus is 5 miles north of Downtown in a residential area, there’s quite a bit to do directly off of campus. Favorite places include Mustang Donuts and JD Cookies. Students can have a car but don’t need it; a DART pass costs $5 – which lasts all 4 years!

The students aren’t lacking for things to do on campus.

  • ~SMU mustangs

    Go Mustangs!

    Sports are a huge deal.

    • People tailgate on Bishop Boulevard (they call it Boulevarding, not Tailgating). Our tour guide is a little disappointed that more people tailgate than go to the game.
    • Basketball tickets are in the highest demand. The school makes an effort to let students support the teams — they even got to go to the Final 4 for free.
    • A lot of sports are not on campus which is something the tour guide said he’s like to change.
  • ~SMU Greek house

    One of the Greek Residences

    About 1/3 of students go Greek, pledging in the spring.

  • SMU sponsors lots of concerts and speakers both on campus and in Dallas.
  • The first Saturday on campus is “Night at the Club,” basically a huge club fair. “You can get the free t-shirt, cactus, goldfish, whatever they’re giving out.” The tour guide appreciated that the students have ownership.
~SMU res commons 2

A Residential Common

SMU is in the middle of a massive expansion of their residential spaces. They’ve already added several new Residential Commons and are building more. Students are assigned to 1 of the 11 Commons as freshmen and will stay there through sophomore year. Each Common has faculty-in-residence.

~SMU 3“Aggressive students who are independent learners will do well here,” said the Director of Admissions. A faculty member added: students who want to learn to lead and aren’t afraid to take risks fit right in.” Students are in charge of planning a lot on campus. For example, they’re given the $250,000 budget for homecoming. Advisors help them frame the event (“How will you be inclusive?” etc), but ultimately, it’s in the students’ hands.

The 6000 undergrads have access to 100 majors and 75 minors.

  • ~SMU business lobby

    Business School lobby

    Humanities and Sciences is the largest school.

    • It’s the home to Pre-Health and Pre-Law tracks; the advice of the Dean is to “major in something you love and will do well in, and then go to them for advising.” Selected students are invited into the Scholars Program to participate in Seminars, work with faculty for the LSAT, etc.
    • There are several new interdisciplinary programs such as Health and Society (either physiological or sociological) and minors in International Studies and Public Policy and Jewish Studies (what is it to be part of this culture across the globe and across time).
    • Unusual majors include: Statistical Science, Geophysics, and Medieval Studies.
  • ~SMU dining hall

    One of the dining halls

    The Meadows School of the Arts is highly selective; one of the tour guides came here because she was sold by the great arts program. Dallas has one of the largest art complexes in the world so students can get quite a bit of experience. SMU’s program is entrepreneurial in nature; since 60% of artists are self-employed, they learn how to manage a website, develop a business plan, etc. The goal to get students to fluidly adapt to the changing arts landscape in order to make a living as an artist.

  • Education and Human Development is the smallest school, home to Education (100% pass rate on national exams), Psychology/counseling, Applied Physiology, Sports Management, and Health Care Management.
  • Lyle School of Engineering School: Interesting majors include Cyber Security and Video Design Engineering. Just over 1/3 of the students are female (twice the national average).
    • In the first semester, students work in a group to do a project such as building a robot that can maneuver through a maze, find water, test to see if it’s potable, and if it’s not, remediate it. It’s a true group effort: the mechanical engineer needs to build it; the electrical needs to design the eyes, the environmental needs to design the test probe, the civil needs to make sure it isn’t collapsing under its own weight.
  • Cox School of Business: Students can earn a BBA or minor in Business or Business Administration.
    • Unusual majors include Financial Consulting, Real Estate Finance, and Risk Management and Insurance. Concentrations include Energy Management and Entrepreneurship.
    • About 100 incoming freshmen are selected as BBA Scholars each year.

~SMU outdoor patioWe asked the student panelists what they liked about SMU and why they chose to come here. It was refreshing to hear that one of them didn’t originally want to come! She didn’t get excited until week 2. “Once they see how inclusive people are and how excited they are to be here, they’ll want to come here too.” Other answers included:

  • Grills in a residential area

    Grills in a residential area

    Quality of the faculty and the program. The reputation of programs increase all the time.

  • Access to the faculty
  • Location: not just the city, but the attitude. “It’s a can-do place.” Many graduates take their first jobs here in town.
  • The campus. Everyone helps take care of it. “Life is too short to go to college on an ugly campus!”
  • “I like the other students. We go to school with really really really cool kids!”

© 2015

 

Bellarmine University

BELLARMINE UNIVERSITY (visit 9/16/14)

~Bellarmine statue 2Bellarmine (pronounced “Bell-are-min”) is a medium-sized (2,500 undergrads) Catholic university in a residential neighborhood of Louisville, Kentucky. Although originally an all-male institution, they merged with the all-female Ursiline College in the 1960s. Today, the student body is almost 2/3 women, due in part to the nursing program.

Both the campus and the students were impressive. The students we spoke to were articulate and weren’t “scripted” – the spoke openly about their experiences, giving personal examples of their life on campus rather than just mindlessly spouting information given to them by the admissions office. One of our tour guides, a psych major, said that one of her favorite classes had been Intro to Acting. “If it hadn’t been for that class, I wouldn’t be here talking to you now.”

~Bellarmine students 2Lauren, one of the Admissions Reps, presented the info session to us (a group of counselors); she prefaced it by saying that she was going to do the presentation as she would have if we were a bunch of prospective students so we would get a sense of what our students would hear. Early in the presentation, she said, “The question you need to be asking yourself is, ‘Can you see yourself succeeding here as a student?’” which is a wonderful way for students to approach the search process.

~Bellarmine ampitheaterThe Catholic heritage is clearly part of the university but isn’t overbearing. Many of the values are woven into aspects of campus like the full day of service that all students do during Orientation. One of our tour guides self-identified as Catholic, the other as a non-denominational Christian. Both enjoy the feeling on campus. The religion is there for those who want it. A small campus chapel holds Catholic masses and other Christian services, none of which are mandatory. Students do have to take 2 theology classes (1 in world religions and 1 elective) during their time here, which they see as very reasonable.

~Bellarmine sci centerStudents also have to take 2 lab science classes; in addition to the bio, chem, and other more traditional classes, they can fulfill this with classes like Human Health and Disease, Astronomy, or Gross Anatomy (Bellarmine is 1 of only 8 undergraduate institutions that offer this class!). As a freshman, my tour guide had to reassemble organs in the Cadaver Lab. Bellarmine has a contract with the local zoo; the university gets the animals when they die in order to provide study opportunities for the students (including once getting a giraffe which a professor was going to use to study decomposition, until they realized that they had placed it too close to the air-vents on the roof!). One of the physics professors works with a super-collider (CERN). Upperclassmen help analyze the data.

Nursing, Clinical Lab Sciences, and Respiratory Care Therapy majors make up almost 1/3 of the student population. Nursing, a direct-entry program (assuming criteria is met), counts for about 20% of students, and students speak very highly of the program.

Not surprisingly, their Theology program is strong, as is Math (including Actuarial Science), Poli Sci, Kinesiology, Digital Arts and Technology (with an emphasis in music, art, and communications), Computer Engineering, foreign languages, and Arts Management.

~Bellarmine library inside

Inside of the Library

One of the biggest draws for students is the interaction they have with professors. The largest classroom on campus has 70 seats; the average class size is 20. “We’re setting them up for success,” said an Admissions rep. Students do get to know professors well. In exit interviews, the vast majority say they would make the same decision to do it all over again; when asked where they would like to see money spent, many of them said they would put money towards increasing salary of professors!

All dorm rooms have AC, carpet, a microwave and fridge, and are cable-ready. About ¾ of freshmen life on campus, including in 1 of 4 learning communities: STEM, Honors, Social Engagement, and Health Sciences (called Galileo). About 50% of the entire undergrad population lives on campus. There are a lot of hills on campus – one of the students said that it’s hard to gain the Freshman 15 because of this. In fact, they also give a “hybrid tour” to prospective students using both walking and trolleys because of the hills! Freshmen can have cars on campus, but there are bike rentals and buses for people who don’t have them, so cars aren’t necessary.

~Bellarmine soccerLouisville one of 20 largest cities in the country. It’s been named as one of the top cities for entrepreneurship, a top food city, and a great 20-something city. There’s lots going on, but students don’t often look to Louisville for entertainment since there’s plenty to do on campus. Sports are mostly DIII except for the lacrosse team (DI). Knights Nation is a group dedicated to celebrating the Knights at different games. One well-loved tradition is wearing Halloween costumes to basketball games. There are 90+ other clubs, as well, including a breakdancing club, a Pokemon League, and a Whovian Society. The Daily Knight newsletter will announce upcoming events.

The application is free and is moving to all-online. Currently there is no Common App option. The Honors program requires a 28+ ACT and 3.4 GPA, but they are moving this year to an application-based process. Most students receive scholarships of some sort. The average merit award is around $21,000; comprehensive packages average around $29,000. They do give 5 full-tuition scholarships each year; to be considered for one of these, applicants must submit an essay by 12/1. Competitive students have a 30+ ACT or 1330 SAT and a 3.4 unweighted GPA. Faculty read and invite students to come compete for the scholarship.

© 2014

SUNY Purchase

SUNY Purchase (visited 8/12/14)

~SUNY Purchase acad bldgSUNY Purchase is located on a large campus (about 500 acres – including the first multi-racial cemetery in the area that sits in the middle of campus) about 30 miles north of New York City. It’s in a suburban community only a few miles from the interstate and the Westchester Airport (which was obvious during our tour when several planes flew so closely overhead that they guide had to stop talking until the noise subsided). The university opened in 1968, designed to be the “artistic” campus of the SUNY system. Governor Rockefeller chose the location to allow students to access the resources of the NY Metro area. The school runs a free shuttle service to White Plains (20 minutes away) that runs every hour from 7 am to midnight (2 am on weekends). From there, they can catch MetroNorth into New York City (30 minutes away on an express train). Students are allowed to bring cars; parking only costs $20 and parking areas are assigned based on the student’s earned credits.

~SUNY Purchase music library

Music Library

About 1/3 of the students major in the arts (theater, music, dance, film, or the fine arts). However, the school is designed for students who don’t ONLY want that conservatory or Art/Design experience. They offer a BA, BS, or BFA/BMus degree. Students majoring in the arts can choose the level of involvement they want: the BA and BS degrees will give them much more flexibility to take electives outside of the major, whereas the BFA requires about 2/3 of the coursework to be in the major. Adding that to the required distribution requirements (about ¼ of their coursework) means that they have little flexibility to take electives or add a minor or another major without taking extra time. There’s also a more selective admissions process. For example, only 20 students are admitted to the theatre BFA program a year and work as a cohort in productions and classes. However, many more students can get involved in productions open to the BA students interested in theater and performance.

“Purchase is a small place. There are 4,200 students here. You’re not going to be a number. The largest lecture hall you’ll ever be in holds 70 students. If you want to~SUNY Purchase patio be a number, go to Buffalo,” said Jon, the Admissions Rep giving the info session. Our tour guides both said that their largest classes had 30 students; the smallest had 8 and 12. The only graduate students are in the arts, so undergraduates in other areas are doing research with the faculty. They have a very limited number of grad students teaching classes for non-majors.

Students have all the resources of the SUNY system at their disposal. There are standard state-wide gen-ed requirements throughout the SUNY system, so students can transfer those classes easily if they’d like to take anything at another campus over the summer. Students can also take advantage of study-abroad options or other special programs through any campus.

SUNY Purchase art studio

An Art Studio

A science building

A science building

Some of their unusual majors include Media Society and The Arts, New Media (a tech-based arts major: one students used webcams to film a “24 hour sunrise”), Arts Management (for those interested in the business aspect of art), and Language and Culture (students can study Hausa, Hebrew, or Chinese as well as the more common European languages). Many students complete internships for credit under the direction of a faculty member. Students are assigned work to be turned into the professor in addition to whatever is assigned to them on the job.

Applicants NOT interested in the performing arts can use either the SUNY App or the Common App. However, performing arts applicants can only use the SUNY app. Admissions is selective; they accept about 1/3 of applicants not looking to go into any of the arts majors. The acceptance rate in the arts depends on department and the student’s focus. (“Bassoon players have a much easier time than violinists!” said the rep). Admitted students tend to have about an 87 average and 1100 SAT. Scholarships are automatically granted to non-performing arts applicants; recipients tend to have a 90+ average and 1200+ SAT. In the arts, scholarships are awarded through the particular department/area based on academic and talent combined.

~SUNY Purchase dorm room

A triple-style dorm room

About 65% of students live on campus; space is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Fort Awesome (dorms are named by students – other dorms include Big House, Far House, and Outback) is the newest dorm and houses upperclassmen. This is the only dorm with wifi; the others are all equipped with Ethernet hook-ups, “but you can buy a router from the Tech Office if you want,” said the tour guide. The first floor has classes and art space. Dorm rooms for freshmen are converted triples (basically double-sized rooms with a third person added) because of increased numbers of freshmen and transfers. There are some Learning Community Floors with double rooms (and the RA will be in that major). There are also 4-, 6- and 8- person suites scattered throughout the dorms. The 8-person suite has its own bathroom. The others have a common room but share the bathroom down the hall. There are a couple food options on campus. There’s the more traditional all-you-can-eat dining hall; the tour guides said that Sundae Friday, Wing Wednesday, and Stir-fry Thursday are popular. The Hub is campus food court where meals are done on the ABC plan (meaning they choose something from each category: Main meal, a side, and a drink). Meals don’t roll week to week; “If you have meals left by Friday, students start using up the points at the campus store so you don’t lose them by Sunday,” said the tour guide.

Traditions that the students are particularly excited about are Zombie Prom and Culture Shock (a weekend art festival). There is no Greek life on campus. Students are not bored on campus. There are always events, activities, and clubs doing things. The Cheese Club got mentioned a couple times (and apparently is so popular that there’s a waiting list – never heard of that for a club before!). The founder was a film major and got interested in cheese made from camel’s milk which led her to research camels which led to her senior projects about different products from camels.

Everyone does a Senior Project (check out this YouTube video on it), a serious academic work in an area of their choosing. Since this is a full-year project, students sign up for a 3-credit class both terms, and usually do the preliminary plans, including choosing an advisor, in their junior year.

© 2014

College of Charleston

~CofC sign 2COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON (visited 4/5/14)

~CofC mascot

Mascot

COC was founded in 1770, making it the 13th oldest university in the country. Much of the campus reflects this feel with central campus dominated by historic buildings and moss covered trees. Although started as a private college, it’s now public school with about 10,050 undergraduates; however, they draw a significant number of their students (about 38%) from outside of SC. Housing is guaranteed for freshmen, but most students move off campus after that. There are several historic houses that upperclassmen live in, and “commuting” is usually within walking distance. Parking is available but expensive, so many students don’t bring cars. Downtown is within easy walking distance, including a lot of restaurants and stores.

~CofC walkway 3~CofC fountainUnique or strong programs include: Arts Management (looking at the business side such as running galleries, music, etc), Historic Preservation and Community Planning (lots of experiences in the city, and they have a Joint degree in Preservation with Clemson); Astrophysics; Computing in the Arts; Computer Science (very popular – they’re putting up a new building, and students work for Google and Boeing, both of which have big offices in town); specializations within Business Admin (the most popular major in terms of enrollment) including Commercial Real Estate, Global Logistics and Transportation; Hospitality and Tourism Management (the flagship program); and Leadership, Change, and Social Responsibility; International Business (students must minor in a language and must study abroad); and Education (they have the highest Praxis II scores in the state). Foreign languages they offer (to at least the Intermediate level) include: Ancient Greek, Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, and Russian in addition to the more popular offerings.~CofC acad bldg 3~CofC chapel and bikes

~CofC archStudents admitted to the Honors College almost always come in as freshmen so they can start and continue through with their cohort. There are also specific classes they need to take through the Honors College. If they think they want to apply once they’re on campus, they should talk to advisors to make sure that they don’t enroll in classes that they’ll have to repeat. Classes are smaller, averaging about 14 students per class. Honors students will complete an independent study in one semester and a bachelor’s paper which normally takes two semesters to complete. There is new Honors-specific housing available consisting of two floors of coed suites.

They’re a DI school playing in the Colonial Conference, and basketball is the big spectator sport. Unusual sports include sailing (both men and women) and sand volleyball (women).

© 2014

Post Navigation