campus encounters

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Archive for the category “New York”

SUNY Brockport

SUNY Brockport (visited 3/9/20)

Brockport main signStudents who want a medium-sized school (just over 7,000 undergrads), located in a nice town not far from a major city (Rochester), with lots of school spirit (including high quality athletics), and great academic options at an amazing price-point (including for out-of-state students) will like this school and need to put this on their radar.

Brockport underpass

One of the underpasses under the railroad tracks with art murals done by students. 

“You hit the nail on the head with the size,” said the rep when I mentioned that this seemed like a manageable campus. “You aren’t schlepping across a huge campus, but there’s always something to do and people to see. There are lots of opportunities to network with faculty, to go abroad, to do an internship. Students can do hands-on work in the first year. It’s a nice community. There’s no sense of being in a silo; people are into a lot of things.” Campus is split by some railroad tracks (“They hardly ever come through. I think I heard them about 3 times in my 4 years here,” said the tour guide): one side feels more traditional/historic with brick buildings; the other has more open spaces, modern feeling buildings, and athletic facilities. Covered walkways connect a lot on this side of campus, and there’s an attractive Alumni Walk runs up by the Liberal Arts building.

Brockport covered walkways

Some of the covered walkways on one half of campus

I loved our tour guide! It’s so refreshing to get one who isn’t scripted and can carry on authentic conversations with people on the tour. I was on a small tour with only 2 other families, and we had great conversations with the guide. I walked away feeling like I knew a lot about the school – and that I’d feel good about pointing students in this direction (which is exactly what schools are trying to do with these tours – but not enough of them hit the mark the way Brockport did.)

Brockport sculpture

A sculpture commemorating the Special Olympics which are frequently held on campus

There’s a big sense of social justice at Brockport. “Students are active. They’ll protest peacefully if there’s something they don’t agree with. They profile things in the magazine, write editorials in the paper, bring groups together to share ideas which are then shared with staff,” said one of the reps. “There are a lot of focused clubs, and even those that aren’t specific, it’s still at their core. We’d like to open up our international student population to bring more people into the community.” Diversity is generally good: the LGBTQ community is visible, active, and accepted. There’s an active Hillel on campus. Financial aid and HEOP programs are strong which increases socio-economic diversity. “Things are welcoming and personalized here. I’d love to get the message out on that more.”

Brockport library int 1The rep at lunch said, “This is place where you can find your niche, and then find someone doing it better than you who can mentor you and push you.” The average class size is 23; I asked my tour guide about his classes: the largest had 60 and smallest was 20. He took a grad class with 3 other people. His favorite classes were Abnormal Psych (“the professor shared a lot of first hand experience stories”) and his Cross-Cultural Psych class which he took during a Study-Abroad in Austria.

Brockport skeletons library

I’ve never seen skeletons on reserve in a school library before!

I’m really impressed with the sciences here. Even students who aren’t in a major are doing real things in their core requirements. The tour guide said, “I took a science class where they took bacteria swabs in the gym. Some things you can’t unsee.” Among some of the cool options for majors include Water Resources, Meteorology (there’s also a Broadcast Meteorology minor!), a Bio/PharmD combined degree, Medical Technology, Kinesiology, EnviSci/Ecology joint BS/MS, and Chemistry with ACS Certification.

Brockport liberal arts building

The new Liberal Arts Building as seen from the Alumni Walk

The nursing major is an “Intent program,” said the rep. Students come in having declared their intent to major in that. A strong B average and a 1060 SAT usually gets them into the Intent major. “There is some drop because they realize it’s not what they want or they can’t handle the sciences. We’ll work with them to find if they have something else they want that speaks to their interests if it’s the science or working with people.” Students work on pre-reqs and then apply in Sophomore year; usually there are about 40 spots, but this can change year to year. A 3.5 minimum GPA keeps them competitive.

Other academic programs that reps or the tour guide brought up were:

Brockport LLC infoI asked the rep at lunch what he most wanted to brag about: “Study abroad. We have the most extensive program in the SUNY system. There are over 100 programs in 33 countries, and if students don’t like those, we can funnel them through other SUNY programs, too.”

Brockport freshman quad

Freshman Quad with the sand volleyball court

There’s a two-year residency requirement, and about half of the campus residents live in LLCs. They just built a hotel-style residence hall “which is great!” said the tour guide. There’s a freshman quad which has a sand volleyball court in between the dorms; they often hold a Battle of the Buildings. There’s some Greek life but “not a big deal.” Off-campus housing is easy to find. “It’s cheap, and the school has a list of reputable landlords.” The food is very good; one of the reps came to lunch with us after the tour so we got to check it out. In the dining hall we went to, it felt a bit like a high school food line, but the food itself was amazing! They’re ranked 3rd in the SUNY system for food quality (I need to find out who beat them out!). It did get busy at lunch, but they moved people through the line quickly and there was enough seating.

Brockport 3Although athletics are DIII, they’re “DI in quality. We’re the national wresting and gymnastics champions.” Club sports often compete against DI teams. Students tend to come out and support the teams. Students looking for other things to do can head into Rochester, located 25 minutes away (where they can see professional baseball, soccer, and hockey teams as well as hit restaurants, museums, etc). The Rochester Airport is only 15 miles away, so it’s easy to get to and from campus.

© 2020

SUNY Geneseo

SUNY Geneseo (visited 3/9/20)

Geneseo quad 1If you’re looking for a medium sized school with strong academics, an active and engaged student body, and lots of things to do on and off campus – all at an affordable price-point, this is a school you want to take a closer look into. It seems to offer the best of all worlds.

Geneseo main street 1

Main Street running by campus with Emmaline the Bear on the pole of the fountain – keep reading for more information on her! 

The town of Geneseo is smaller than I anticipated (but is listed as having a population of 10,000+ so not tiny!) – but that doesn’t mean there’s not stuff to do. The town caters to students. Main Street, with a myriad of restaurants, bars, and cafes, runs right along campus. Chain stores like Target are about 1.5 miles from campus and buses run out there about every 20 minutes.

Geneseo bear

Closeup of Emmaline

Outdoorsy students will not be at a loss for options: Letchworth State Park (the “Grand Canyon of the East”) is 20 minutes away, and there are plenty of trails, waterfalls, ski resorts and other things around. For students wanting more urban options, Rochester (with a million people in the greater metro area) is only 35 minutes north of campus and Buffalo/Niagara Falls is a little over an hour away. However, the frequent on-campus events (including cool sounding events like the “Insomnia Film Festival”) mean that there’s never a shortage of things to do.

Geneseo main 1

The old High School, now housing Admissions, study spaces, and more

Campus is great. The college does a great job repurposing as well as updating buildings; the old town high school and elementary schools are on campus, upgraded and used for a variety of things (like the admissions office is in the old high school). “It’s kind of cool to be in the old elementary school with the lockers in the hall!” said the tour guide. They’re currently in the middle of a massive $25m renovation of the library that’s expected to take a few years. They had to move things out of the building and got creative with how they’ve spread resources and study spaces across campus. When I arrived at Admissions, there were several students studying in lounge full of couches and windows (and a Keurig!) outside of the office; I asked the tour guide if this was normal. He said that this is one of many study new spaces popping up around campus for students to use while the library is being worked on.

Geneseo quad students

Some of the patios and other outdoor spaces, overlooking part of the valley in the distance. The Gazebo is directly to the right from this vantage point.

The rep, herself a Geneseo alumna, said, “the undergrad population [about 5,500 students] is the star of the show here.” There are only 100 grad students on campus in two programs, accounting and education. “We’re not a research institution per se, but we do the same types of research as peer institutions, and undergrads are doing it because there grad students aren’t here.”

Geneseo 4

The Gazebo

They have a 90% FT faculty rate so there are fewer adjuncts; “it’s much easier to meet outside of the classroom,” said the tour guide. He loves the access to the professors. Upperclassmen can serve as TAs but don’t ever teach; they tutor and give extra help for recitations and exam prep. Most programs also provide Learning Centers for students. “We won’t have them for the smallest things like Biophysics, but those students will go to bio or physics for help,” he said.

Geneseo integrated sci cntr

The Integrated Science Center

Geneseo is fairly well known for its sciences and have put a lot of money into its new Integrated Science Center. They’re ranked in the top 10 for alumni who’ve gone on to get doctorates in STEM fields (and physics in particular). They’re even the only school in Western New York with a Pelletron particle accelerator!

They do offer some impressive academic offerings, particularly for a school of this size, and they have some interesting interdisciplinary majors. A few to take note of are:

  • Geneseo sci atrium

    The Science Center atrium (with a wall displaying the periodic table)

    Sociomedical Sciences: I can’t think of another school off the top of my head that offers this, although I’m sure that some of the large schools probably do. This combines biology, psychology, anthropology, sociology – all the background students will need for careers in areas like bioinformatics, public health, health admin, or health services.

  • Geophysics, Geochemistry, Biophysics, and Biochemistry
  • Black Studies
  • Theater & English (yes, a combined degree) – again, I don’t know of another school that specifically does this (although I’ve seen theater as a concentration in English).
Geneseo flags

The tour guide wasn’t entirely sure what was going on with the statues over the door, but they’re a fun addition to the room!

My tour guide was in International Relations major, and he said that he felt that the non-science majors are also very strong here. “They’re setting us up for success. We have a lot of opportunities here.” The IR students have to study abroad; my tour guide was heading to Holland for a month. “I don’t speak the language, but I imagine that I’ll pick some up. I did it because the class sounds great!” They have an extensive study abroad program – particularly since students can access the entire SUNY system to choose programs if Geneseo doesn’t offer something they’re interested in.

Geneseo Seuss tree

The Seuss Spruce

I asked the tour guide about his favorite classes:

  • He took one on Woody Guthrie (who influenced him and who he influenced). “I love music and am a big Woody Guthrie buff, so this was great.”
  • He said he also loved his Geology class that, admittedly, he took to fulfill a requirement but ended up loving it. “Every Thursday at 8am, I was out hiking in the woods right near campus. The professor got us outside a lot. We did water samples and all sorts of stuff.”

Geneseo quad 3Athletics are another bragging point, with a lot of their teams (all but 2 last year) qualifying for post-season tournaments. I wish I had more time so I could’ve checked out the stables used for the Equestrian Program. These are located less than a mile from campus so they’re easily accessible. The students do need to be there a certain number of hours a week for practice and maintenance, but students can work around their class schedule. The college will also be adding a women’s golf team in fall of 2020.

Geneseo Greek tree

The Greek Tree

A few cool traditions or interesting trivia about campus include:

  • The Seuss Spruce which has become the (unofficial?) icon of the college. “It got damaged in a storm, and the college was going to take it down, but the students protested and they left it up,” my tour guide explained.
  • The Bell tower plays every couple hours. “You hear some weird stuff coming out of there!”
  • Greek Tree: “It’s got years worth of paint on it. It used to be tradition that they’d paint as far up as they could go, but you can see that kind of fell by the wayside!”
  • Geneseo knightSigning a Knight: Seniors get to sign a suit of armor that is then displayed on campus.
  • The Gazebo: people go there to watch the sunset across the valley. They’ve been named the top 10 sunset-watching spot!
  • Emmaline the Bear: This actually isn’t on campus; it stands on a fountain on Main Street. It had been there for about 100 years without any incident; about 10 years ago, it got knocked down by a truck that ran into the fountain “and has been knocked down about 3 times since then.”

© 2020

Keuka College

Keuka College (visited 3/6/20)

Keuka sign

The main building from the road with the college sign

Keuka has some potential, but they haven’t utilized much of it. The people are wonderful, and the students seem content there, but this will be a very hard sell for students coming from a distance. The college sits on about 1300 feet of Keuka Lake waterfront, but they don’t seem to have made use of their location. Other than a small boathouse (students can use canoes, paddleboards, etc), they haven’t capitalized on the lake: they could’ve done quite a bit with a sailing or crew team, offered specialized marine ecology/biology programs, or somehow set up other unique programs that would be draws to the school. I did find, after some poking around on their website, that they have a Center for Aquatic Research, but can’t find any info on what they do other than some water quality tests. It would’ve been great to hear more about that during my visit if that’s really a thing since that could be a selling point for students interested in ecology or environmental science.

Keuka chapel 4

The chapel with the lake in the background and the oaks lining the path

The college owns a couple historic buildings: the main building is beautiful, and the chapel that overlooks the lake may be the focal point of campus. (One of the school symbols/traditions is the acorn. Students get one when they arrive to represent their growth into oak trees that line the path to the chapel where graduation is held). However, most of the buildings on this small, walkable campus feel dated and utilitarian. I definitely felt this in the library. It would be great if the college had a bit more money to update them. I asked the rep (a recent alum) what she thought the best change was on campus during her time there: “They built Keuka Commons across the street. It was really needed. The students needed more space. It has a café, classrooms, and study rooms.” I was more impressed with this building, and hopefully the school will continue to upgrade their facilities.

Keuka st cntr extThat all being said, they do run a special program called Field Period: this is what they’re known for and why several people choose to attend Keuka. Students must complete a 120+ hour internship each year. Students get right into classrooms, businesses, industries, etc to see if that’s the career they’d like. “They get experience early which gives them a chance to change majors if needed.” They have most of January off; almost all students complete their internship then or over the summer. Some classes have trips during January and summer where they can get some of the hours in. I asked about how students find these placements: “It’s on them to network. It’s about who they know or reaching out to professors. We also have the Field Period/internship office who will help match them up, but they have to initiate those conversations.” I was a little disappointed to hear that this wasn’t more developed; I can see this being very difficult for first-year students, but apparently whatever they’re doing works since the students are getting the requirement completed. The rep I spoke to graduated from Keuka in 2018; she did one of her experiences in Admissions and ended up loving it, leading to this job.

Keuka courtyardClass size is also a draw; students who do well with hands-on learning, small class discussion, and access to professors will do well here. My tour guide’s largest and smallest classes had 25 and 8 students. I asked the rep what her favorite class had been: “Media Writing: I learned that I loved to write! We utilized real world events and I became co-editor of newspaper in junior year.”

For a school this size, they do run a few programs I didn’t expect. Their top programs are:

  • Keuka OT classroom

    One of the OT labs

    Occupational Therapy is Direct Entry; students complete both their undergrade and a 1-year masters program at Keuka so they don’t have to transfer. For admissions purposes, students need an 85 average overall and minimum 85 in math and science classes. They only have 65 seats, but will accept basically anyone who is qualified, so they recommend that students deposit as soon as they get acceptances to hold their seat. This is refundable before 5/1 if they change their minds. The program has some great classroom and lab/practicum spaces on campus! All students also have to live for a week with some issue or disability (it could be even as simple as a broken leg) to understand the needs of different people coming into the clinic.

  • Keuka 1Nursing is technically a 1+2+1 dual degree program with Finger Lakes Community College in Geneva (about 45 minutes away). Students study at Keuka for their 1st and 4th years; they take their classes/clinicals at FLCC during the 2nd and 3rd years (they live at Keuka all 4 years and get bussed up). After the 3rd year, they sit for the NCLEX and get the AAS degree; they get the BS after the 4th There are only 20 seats so this is the most competitive program at the college. Applicants need at least an 80 average overall and at least an 80 each in Bio and Chem. Again, they encourage students to deposit upon acceptance to save the spot in the program (and this is also refundable before 5/1 if they change their minds). They usually fill the full 20-student cohort.
  • Business options include Management (including 3+1 Masters and Organizational Management options), Marketing, and Accounting. They offer minors in Sports Management and Human Resource Management.
  • Education including a minor in Teaching English Abroad
  • ASL and ASL-English Interpreting
  • E-Sports Management is the newest major to be added and should be fully running in 2020-21.

Keuka theaterE-Sports is the largest sport on campus with about 70 people involved. Keuka is DIII and is in the process of changing conferences so they’ll be playing against more local teams. They have Dance and Step-up teams on campus, and they have the Red Barn Theater (literally an old converted barn). They have a ropes course on campus.

Keuka 4It would be helpful for students to have cars here. Keuka is located in a really rural area, and this is a small campus so students have to make their own fun. “There are definitely some students who transfer out because it’s too small,” said the tour guide, “but a lot of others who like this atmosphere. You have to know what you’re getting into. If this is your thing, you’re going to do great here!” The tour guide said that there are a lot of activities on campus (although I didn’t seen many things advertised, but that could’ve been the time of year, as well). Students can go out on the lake in school-owned kayaks, canoes, and paddleboards. Students are expected to live on campus. Dorms are functional (cool fact – the doors of the dorm I saw were chalk boards so you can write on them!) and the tour guide likes the food. “It’s fairly typical college food; they’re cooking for the masses, but they’re doing a good job with that.”

Keuka library

The interior of the library

The hamlet of Keuka Park has just over 1,000 year-round residents (which means that isn’t big enough to be considered a full town!). Seneca Farms, about 2 miles up the road, is a well-loved spot for fried chicken and ice cream and is the go-to place to get off campus. Penn Yan is the closest town, about 4-5 miles up the road, but “the closest large towns are Geneva and Canandaigua, and you’d need to go there to find much of anything to do,” said the tour guide. Rochester (a little over an hour) or Syracuse (about an hour and a half) are the closest cities.

Keuka 3There are a couple traditions that the tour guide shared with me that she liked:

  • Seniors ring the bell in the Bell Tower on 100-Nights
  • First-years are given acorns “to represent the growth we’ll have during our time here. By the time we leave, we’re the oak trees that line the path to the Chapel where graduation is held.”

During admissions, students with an 80 average or higher automatically qualify for a scholarship; with a 90+ average, the scholarship will basically cut the tuition cost in half, making this an affordable option for students who are looking for this type of environment.

Keuka MLK

A display in the library about MLK visiting campus. 

For a school this size, they’re doing well with some aspects of diversity: “We have students from all sorts of backgrounds,” said the rep, although they have a ways to go to increase the numbers. They’re also about ¾ female right now, so they need to work on attracting and retaining males. “We support people and what they believe or don’t believe in.” There’s a Center for Spiritual Life and an LGBTQ Center bother of which run different programs. “I think they make people feel safe.” Keuka has a sister school in Vietnam for business program: unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to go both ways right now: “We usually don’t send students there; the Vietnamese students come here.”

© 2020

Wells College

Wells College (visited 3/6/20)

Wells sycamore

The famous Sycamore tree with Cayuga Lake in the background

There’s a lot to be said for location! This attractive school full of brick buildings sits on a hill overlooking Cayuga Lake (which students can scuba dive in after being certified in the school pool). Many of the buildings are historic (including Henry Wells’ mansion which is now a dorm), but they’ve done well structurally to upgrade the buildings. For students wanting personal attention in and out of classes, a beautiful location (“We can watch sunsets across the lake – they’re to die for!” said the tour guide), a walkable town and campus, and rich school traditions, give this college a look.

Wells 2

One of the original buildings

Wells is small (hovering around 450 full-time undergrads), but they pack a lot of punch and live up to the “small but mighty” idea. Here, small doesn’t mean limited opportunities: there are plenty of academic and social options on campus as well as at the nearby Ivy League and selective liberal arts colleges. Wells was started as Cornell University’s sister school: Ezra Cornell and Henry Wells (also the founder of Wells Fargo) were good friends; they almost built their colleges on the same land. Today, students take advantage of this relationship with cross-registration options with Cornell and Ithaca College, both within 35-40 minutes to the south of Wells. Shuttles run to the city of Ithaca fairly regularly, as well as to Auburn, about 20 minutes to the north.

Wells stained glass aurora 2

One of the stained glass pieces around campus – this one is of Aurora, the name of the town

They’re holding steady with enrollment, but are trying to work around the national decrease in college-aged students. They went coed in 2005 and are still about 2/3 women. “We didn’t let go of our mission,” said the rep, a recent Wells grad. “There’s an ingrained sense of women’s empowerment. It’s in our traditions. Men here tend to be more open minded.” The rep told me that the administration has changed a bit, and they listen to the students. “Students have a voice. In this day and age, actually hearing students is important. They take that seriously and have implemented a lot of change.”

Academically, they’re changing with the times, restructuring programs for what students need and want. They offer some things that usually you can’t find unless you’re in a huge school.

  • Wells sci atrium

    Science Building atrium

    They offer a full major in Sustainability and a minor in Sustainable Food Systems, both of which are fairly unusual (although I’ve noticed this is becoming more of a thing in the last couple years). Often, this is found embedded within Environmental Studies instead of a separate stand-alone major. Students often mix/match the major (or minor) with business, EnviSci, PoliSci, or another major. Students implement a lot of what they learn on campus providing practical, hands-on opportunities where they’re making a real difference. “The students take a lot of pride in our recycling programs among others.” They have a fabulous new Sustainability Center.

  • Wells study nook

    A study nook in one of the academic buildings

    They offer a minor in First Nations and Indigenous Studies! This is unusual for most schools particularly one this small – but for a school sitting right in the middle of the Iroquois Confederacy, it makes some sense.

  • Book Arts Center: They have 1 of 6 original printing presses in the US, according to the tour guide. The diplomas are made on site (“Students don’t get to make their own diploma, but it’s still pretty cool!”)
  • They’ve combined Economics and Management in a single major; students can choose to concentrate in one of these within the major, but must take classes in both.
  • Health Sciences is big here. They offer minors in Holistic Health Services, Health Care Management. They also have strong pre-professional programs, and they offer a 3+4 PharmD with Binghamton (this cuts out 1 year), a 4+1+2 Nursing (this is something I hadn’t heard of – students get a BA/BS from Wells, and then get a BS in Nursing and a Nurse Practitioner Masters from the University of Rochester)
  • Wells bridge 2“We have a great Education department and NYS certification goes anywhere.” Students can complete the Inclusive Childhood Education (dual certified in Elementary and Spcial Ed) or Secondary Education They offer a minor in Education (this doesn’t lead to certification, but is a good basis if thinking about graduate studies in education or those interested in policy or other areas) and a 4+1 Program with the University of Rochester.
  • They’re looking at including LGBTQ Studies as a major in addition to the Women and Gender Studies that they already offer.
Wells DH

The dining hall

Students have to complete 2 internships; one of these can be on campus, and being a TA for a class can count. They keep strong ties with alumni, allowing for increased access to research and internships. “They’re very involved and donate a lot of money and time,” said the rep.

Gen Ed classes can be as large as 50 students, but usually aren’t that big. My tour guide’s classes ranged from 10-30 students. The Honor Code is taken very seriously here; students don’t have to take their exams in the classrooms. Teachers give out their phone numbers and invite students over for dinner, including Thanksgiving. “The right students for Wells will be those who are comfortable with the size. You’re going to be held accountable. This is a tight-knit community. We kind of have to be, given our size,” said the tour guide who is from New York City.

Wells diversity cntr

Part of the Diversity Center

I asked her what she thought Wells did well in terms of diversity – and what they still needed to work on. “Residentially, it’s diverse. I’m comfortable in the dorms because there are a lot of people like me, but also a lot of different types of people so there’s something for everyone. The commuters … they tend to be very white, but that’s reflective of the community, not the college.” About 40% of students self-identify as Students of Color. The LGBTQ community is well accepted, and she felt that there was fairly decent religious and political diversity, although she thought that people on far ends of those spectrums may have trouble finding a community at Wells.

Wells 6The college is proactive in making sure that they’re accessible and are becoming as diverse as possible, including socio-economic diversity. They made the application (available on Common App and from their website) free in order to lower barriers. They require only two letters of rec which can be from a coach, teacher, counselor, etc. They’re SAT/ACT optional, including for scholarships. Essays can actually be anything, even a video!

Wells carriage

A picture in the library one of the original horse-drawn carriages

Traditions are strong here. One of the most unusual is that seniors arrive to graduation in horse-drawn carriages! Others include:

  • Candlelight ceremony on the first night of orientation; seniors get a champagne breakfast.
  • All students are Odd or Even based on graduation year. They have competitions and spirit games throughout the year. Men and women will form teams for dance-offs, sporting events, etc.
  • Wells Minerva

    Minerva!

    The statue of Minerva has lived through 3 fires; now she’s a symbol of good luck and will get dressed up. Seniors kiss her toes before graduation.

  • Tea Time – this started as a formal thing where people got dressed up; now it’s a Wednesday afternoon study break usually in the Café (which, by the way, is entirely student run, including the hiring).
Wells library int 1

Part of the library

To end, there are a couple final cool facts about Wells:

  • There are no 90 degree angles in the library. It’s one of the most interesting looking college libraries I’ve seen. Students can reserve study carrels and will often decorate them; the Honor code was evident walking through the building and seeing that students left books and personal belongings in the carrels without worrying about them being taken.
  • The creator of the American Girl dolls is a Wells alum.

© 2020

Houghton College

Houghton College (visited 3/19/19)

Houghton quad 2This school is a well-kept secret which is unfortunate. I drove to campus from Erie, and I had quite the scenic drive heading north off Interstate 86. There were plenty of small towns and farms; I checked my GPS at one point to make sure I had programmed it right because I didn’t see any signs for the town of Houghton (pronounced “Hoe-ton” not “How-ton”) or a college of any sort … and then suddenly, I was there.

Houghton chapelThey do NOT make a secret that this is a “Christ-centered education.” While definitely religiously focused, nothing on campus is “in-your-face” or screams “Religious School!” However, students must attend 2/3 of the chapel services held on M, W, and F; the tour guide described a lot of music happening at chapels. Masses are not required, although they are offered on campus (many of which are student-led). Many students choose to go to church in the community. The student worker in the office talked about having a group of friends that she went to church with. Students also have to take 3 religious classes as part of their Gen Eds, including Biblical Lit (“basically an intro to the Old Testament”), Intro to Christ, and an upper level elective.

Houghton 7The directions sent by the admissions office were spot-on – the brick building with the bell tower was one of the first buildings I got to. Parking was plentiful and well marked, something I appreciate more and more as I go on these visits. The welcome center, located right inside, is lovely and warm. Coffee and cookies were set out, and a student was staffing the desk to greet people.

Houghton dorm 2

One of the dorms for females, the biggest on campus. “I think about 300 people live here.”

This is a mostly residential campus. There are 4 dorms (2 each for males and females) and some townhouses for upperclassmen. There are very few commuters mostly because of the rural nature of the community. One of the students I talked to said that she’d like to improve the dorms a bit. “A couple of them are older. They aren’t terrible, but they could use upgrades.” I asked her about the food – “It’s the best I had when looking at colleges. It’s maybe an 8, but I’m not picky.”

Houghton walking trail

One of the walking trails leading from campus. 

The central part of campus is easy to navigate and has a great feeling about it. The athletic facilities and a couple dorms are a bit more of a walk, but even the furthest fields and the new athletic center weren’t any more than a 10 minute walk at a fairly leisurely pace. There are lots of wooded areas and trails for students to use for hiking or running. “Outdoorsy students will definitely like it here,” said the rep (and Letchworth State Park, the “Grand Canyon of the East” is only about 15 minutes away – lots of opportunities for hiking, rafting, camping, etc). The only part of campus that isn’t walkable is the Equestrian Center, a fairly major area a couple miles away; I drove over to see it after the tour and was impressed at the size of the facility. They offer an Equestrian Studies major and minor and an Equine-Assisted Therapy minor.

Houghton equestrian cntr

The equestrian center

I talked to the student at the admissions desk for awhile. She said was surprised her the most was how much of a community this really was. “I chose it for the community but didn’t know just how open people would be.” The 1000 undergrads do become a truly tight-knit community and people tend to get involved; the ruralness of the campus pretty much guarantees that. There are lots of traditions and community-building events, and the Rep who showed me around, herself a recent grad, couldn’t say enough about it.

Houghton 7

Students talking between classes

“Students who want a community are going to do great here. You can’t help but get involved.” Several of the major traditions revolve around the dorms. One of the male dorms always dresses up in wacky costumes and bang on drums during home games. Even the website lists that dorm as “Home of Shen Bloc, a high-energy, raucous cheering section for Highlander athletics.” One of the female dorms always throws a Thanksgiving feast and another throws a party. Other traditions that people brought up were the Bagpipes that are played at graduation and “Scarfing” for freshmen. “We get a scarf; we’re supposed to give it away at graduation to someone meaningful to our experience here, but that doesn’t always happen.”

Houghton Hammock Village

The “Hammock Village” – the only one I’ve ever seen of these on a college campus!

An area for growth that the rep sees is that “we’re predominantly white. We’re trying to increase that. Some of that happens in chapel. We’ll talk about things even if it makes people mad or uncomfortable. We hold forums and have the hard conversations. We’ve had a record high number of students of color coming in.”

Not surprisingly, they have several religiously-themed majors and minors such as Pastoral Ministries, Bible, and Theology. Their music and arts divisions are strong (offering BFAs and BAs in typical areas as well as Music Industry and Applied Design and Visual Communications); the large arts building has an EMA recording studio, practice rooms, and galleries. Students wanting to combine this with Business can earn a bachelor’s in Integrated Marketing Communications.

© 2019

Le Moyne College

Le Moyne College (visited 8/23/18)

LeMoyne statue

Statue of St. Ignatius

This is a small (just under 2,800 undergrads) liberal arts, Jesuit college in a residential section on the edge of Syracuse. It’s a quiet area, but Erie Blvd, a main drag full of restaurants and stores, is less than a mile away. Because of its Jesuit heritage, they stress the development of critical thinking and thinking outside the box; students who embrace this are likely to thrive there.

LeMoyne chalk 2Students who choose Le Moyne come because they don’t want a massive school. The Admissions Rep for my area told me that there’s a stronger sense of community here than anywhere else he has worked; he thinks it might be a Jesuit influence and the ingrained idea that people are important. “I got that sense the first time I visited.” At some large places, “you have world-renowned faculty who you may only see as a grad student and sometimes not even then. Here they want to teach the undergrads, and that comes through loud and clear.”

LeMoyne jesuit residence

The Jesuit Residence

The Jesuit influence is there, but “it’s not heavy-handed,” said the rep. There is a Jesuit Residence on campus and the priests are active. I spoke to several students before taking the tour; 2 of them said they were not looking for a Jesuit school at all; they chose this for other factors. About 60% of students self-identify as Catholic, “but there are all sorts of religions represented including Jewish, Muslim, and nothing at all.” There is no religious requirement other 1 class in religion or philosophy; there is one required community service trip usually during freshman orientation. The tour guide said that he was taking a class on Buddhism to fulfill his requirement. There is a beautiful chapel and masses are offered but never required. However, Mass on the Grass (usually at the beginning of the year) and the Blessing of the Brains (held before finals) are popular events to attend.

LeMoyne chapel 2

The Chapel

Most freshman live on campus, and dorms are fairly typical. They’re slowly renovating them. The most coveted dorm (for underclassmen) is on the top floor of the Business School which has beautiful rooms and AC. They used to alternate years between male and female, “but they guys messed that up,” said the tour guide. “I’m a little annoyed about that!” There are some townhouses and other specialty dorms for upperclassmen, but many also move off campus; there’s plenty of places for rent in the area and plenty of parking. No complaints from students about that. Food “is an 8, mostly because of the options,” said the tour guide.

LeMoyne quad 3

The Quad

Students are pretty happy with the social life on campus. Their sports teams are DII and are popular (participation and to watch). Shuttles run regularly around town to Wegmans (a favorite grocery store), Target/Walmart, and Destiny USA (a massive mall with ropes courses and more inside). There’s a pub on campus; students need to show their school ID and a license to get alcohol. Underage students can get free soda. A favorite tradition is “Dolphy Day” (their mascot is the Dolphin – an early symbol of Christianity). This is a day in the spring, usually late April, when classes get canceled. The actual day is a secret until it’s announced at midnight. The next day, students gather on the quad for barbecues, music, and more.

LeMoyne athletics 1One of the Academic programs that the Rep stressed was the Madden School of Business. “Programs are excellent, and the faculty are terrific,” which leads to a 98% job placement rate coming out of the program. They offer the typical/expected majors, but in addition to those, they also have also one of the top programs for Management Information Systems (ranked 18th in the country), Business Analytics, and HR Management. All students in the school complete at least 1 internships; several do 2-3. There are opportunities around the world, and they can take advantage of the Jesuit school network in India, Mexico, and other parts of the world.

LeMoyne Innovation labIn terms of performing arts, Theater is the only major in visual and performance arts. Minors in dance, visual arts, Arts Administration, and music are available. Auditions are not required for theater or any of the minors, but they are required to get a role in plays or in the music groups. They have several a capella groups: “My favorite is called ‘From Out of Nowhere’,” said the rep.

LeMoyne new science bldg

The new Science building addition

Health Sciences are particularly strong for a school this size, and they even have a cadaver lab. They have Direct Entry Physician Assistant, Occupational Therapy, and Nursing programs as well as a 3+3 Physical Therapy program. PA requires a 1250 SAT; the application deadline is 1/15. They will interview by invitation only; students must have completed at least 10 shadowing hours at that point (and 50 total at point of entry). Nursing is done in conjunction with St. Joe’s School of Nursing in Syracuse, located about 2 miles away. Students complete pre-reqs and capstones on Le Moyne’s campus and the nursing-specific classes and clinicals at St. Joe’s. However, they live on Le Moyne’s campus all 4 years.

© 2018

Wagner College

Wagner College (visited 3/24/17)

Wagner 1The students who thrive here are those who are curious and who want a theory-to-practice experience, said one of the professors. The claim to fame for this college is that they’re the residential liberal arts institution of New York City.

The Wagner Plan is their 3-level general education requirement in which students related theoretical lenses outside the classroom. This is broadly construed ranging from work in the local community to trips to museums, mosques, or other cultural sites.

  • All first-year students enroll in one of 19-21 First-Year Programs co-taught by 2 professors. They both teach 1 content-specific class; the 3rd is a team-taught, reflective, writing-intensive class to connect content to experience. Recent combinations included Philosophy/Psych, Spanish/Business, and Ways of Thinking/Sociology. “From a faculty perspective, it’s fun. We get creative and it teaches us about another discipline.”
  • Wagner main 1

    The iconic main building. If it looks familiar, it’s because School of Rock and an episode of The Sopranos were shot here.

    The intermediate class can be taken as early as 2nd semester freshman year, but usually is done in sophomore year. Two professors often teach discipline-specific classes (with some team-teaching) with common assignments to connect them; there isn’t a 3rd class.

  • The last is a Capstone/Senior Reflective Tutorial. Departments have leeway in how they define this; they’re best know how to prepare the students for the next level. Some will do summer research; sometimes it’s internships or a thesis.
Wagner anchor and dorm

The anchor with an upperclassman dorm in the background

“Lots of social dialogues happen here,” said one student panelist. Like many campuses, there’s an item that gets painted. “We’re pretty politically involved. The anchor got painted for Black Lives Matter with body outlines on the ground, for Pride week, etc.” Students agreed that there were a lot of very progressive students. Another student on the panel said, “We’re passionate about anything about our living situation and our food. The changes made since freshman year have been amazing.” They now have a Gender-Neutral floor. “We argued for it. Really, under the traditional rules, I [a male] could live with my boyfriend. It would be “safer” if I lived with a girl!”

Wagner city

The view of Manhattan from one of the dorms

The tour guides agreed that this is not a quiet campus. About 85% of all students live on campus: “Moving off campus is an option, but they’re still looking at NYC rents. It’s not the Upper East Side, but it’s still steep.” Greek Life only pulls in 16% of students so people are involved in lots of other things. “There maybe aren’t as many organized events as other campuses, but the flip side of that is there’s the city. You get college discounts everywhere, but here, you get discounts in NYC. We can see Broadway shows for $30.” Shuttles leave campus on the :10 and :40 to take students to the ferry. “You go for the first time during Orientation. It takes away the stress.” There are things to do near campus, as well, but “we’re on a hill. Most students don’t like having to hike back up it!” The city buses are not free but are easily accessible, and there are shuttles to the mall, the movies, etc.

All theater and sporting events (DI!) are free, but students say that school spirit isn’t too high. Football doesn’t draw crowds, but basketball does. (As a side note, the Women’s Water Polo team has the highest GPA of any polo team in the country). They use the Staten Island minor league stadium for their home baseball games.

We asked the student panelists what they would like to change:

  • Wagner dorm 2

    Harborview Dorm, one of the older dorms on campus (but with great views!)

    Update living situations. The towers were built in 1963 and haven’t been renovated.

  • The Science department has lots of potential, but it costs money. The faculty put time into getting grants to help bring students into research. Lab space is sufficient, but not huge.
  • Food is mediocre. It fluctuates. “But at least I didn’t get the Freshman 15.”
  • “Some of the codes are grandfathered in because buildings are so old. Our theater is in a gym. They’ve done a bunch, but acoustically it’s still a gym. Dance studios don’t have spring floors.”
Wagner dorms 4

More dorms

Academics are overall strong; they look to hire teachers, not researchers: “That’s fantastic if you brought in a million dollar grant or published a paper, but if you can’t teach, we don’t want you!” This isn’t to say that there isn’t research, because there is, but learning is put first and foremost. Research is easy and not hugely competitive. “You just need to be proactive. If you’re a science major, you have to have a research experience in junior year, and even psych majors have 2 experimental classes. It’s very easy to go to professors and get involved.”

Wagner 4Unusual programs include Biopsychology, Microbiology, and Behavioral Economics. Strong programs include:

  • Education: Students get at least 25 hours of experience in every Edu class.
  • Theater: “It’s competitive, but we have fun and are friendly.” They receive 500 apps for 32 spots. Admissions first clears students and invite approximately 275 to audition. About half audition in person (they try to tie this in with the spring show) and another 50 or so send in a video audition. The department puts on 4 productions a year and get a lot of community support.
  • Nursing: This is not direct entry; students complete the pre-reqs and take the T6 (basic skills – everyone takes this) As long as they pass, they’re in the program. Nursing students can do research. One did a project looking at whole/non-processed foods in Bodegas and helped provide incentives to put this type up front.
  • The Art, Art History, and Film Department is strong and active with trips and internships (Met, Morgan Library, Neue Galerie, Marvel Comics, Rachel Ray Show, Downtown Community TV, Tibetan Museum of Art, Staten Island Museum). Students are successful studio artists, grad school, entrepreneurs (including publishing), education management in museums, fashion designer
    • Film and Media Studies offers 3 tracks (civically engaged, artistic production, criticism) as well as a dual track in Art and Education.
      • They’re looking at Public Art and bringing in the social engagement.
      • Several interdisciplinary classes like “Illustration, Sleep, and Dreams (w/ psych), Connecting Families through Documentary Film (w/ Philosophy), Food and Fasting in the Old and New World (Art History/Anthro), Cities and perversities (Art History/French)
    • Wagner statueThe Chemistry Department is ACS certified (only 30% of schools get this). Gen Chem maxes out at 28 students taught by senior level professors. “Fabulous things come out of lunchroom conversations. I’m changing the world in the way that’s valued by the liberal arts community. We send a couple students per year, many women, off to become PhDs.”
    • Wagner has 1 of 3 planetariums in the city! (“It’s part of why I came here, and I haven’t even gone to it yet!” said a tour guide).
    • Physician Assistant: They invite 90 students to interview (they usually get about 200 applications) and can take 40. This 5-year program includes 3 study abroad experiences: a week in London (psych and some clinical work in a hospital, and they can go back and do psych rotation for 4 weeks); Guatamala in the 4th year (they complete clinical care in local mountain towns); and Belize in the 5th “It’s an unbelievably collaborative group and team-oriented in the classes. Older students mentor younger ones.” Tuition is a little higher for PA, but includes all study abroad trips and some of the summer costs. They complete 2 full years of clinical work (1 of 2 in the country to do this).
    • The Expanding Your Horizons program allows for short term travel abroad, usually linked to a class.

Wagner picnic areaWe asked the student panel about their favorite classes:

  • “The Education class part of my freshman LC. We talked about the law behind Special Ed. We did community service, and I was partnered with an amazing girl! I got to see a different perspective when we worked on daily living skills. It was fascinating to have those conversations.”
  • International Filmmaker: “We learned about the impact people have had. We got an inside look on European and other films.”
  • Musical Theater Performance. “The teacher was a Tony Award Winner. I have 2 teachers who are currently on Broadway. The pianist we work with plays for Hamilton sometimes!”

Students were surprised by:

  • How much professors wanted to reach out. “I studied abroad. I was home for 5 days and got a phone call wanting to know if I was back and if I wanted to get coffee.”
  • The community of people. I felt really welcomed. Even football people came up and talked. It was very different from high school.
  • I was in a philosophy class freshman year with people with diversity of views. I started out thinking “How could you think like that?” I was in a bubble from my little Catholic school but I saw other bubbles and why people believe what they believe.

© 2017

University of Rochester

University of Rochester (visited 10/19/15)

~UR main quad

Main quad with the library at the far end

“We’re fundamentally a research university,” said the V-P of Enrollment. “Faculty are hired because they’re doing good work.” Rochester is nationally ranked in the top 10 for faculty research. Because of this, they’re looking for students who are, first and foremost, curious. “They aren’t asking what they should do – they’re asking why they should do it. We do a lot of things well, and all of them have some research component. We’re looking for students who are prepared – and hopefully excited – about that. If they don’t take advantage of this part of the university, if they aren’t connecting to at least one professor, they aren’t getting what they’re paying for.”

~UR students“We want quirky kids who will push the boundaries and ask probing questions – but not so out-there weird that they can’t live with a roommate.” Teachers go really fast; classes are full of highly motivated students. Rigor is the thing that unifies the entire community. The professors make great teachers because as researchers, they also know what it is to be a learner. They’re guiding the students on the journey, not worrying on Sunday night about that they’re going to say on Monday morning.

~UR walkway 3Because of Rochester’s curricular flexibility and no required subjects, they tend to have a lot of cross-apps with Brown “but we don’t have a wide open curriculum. We aren’t Brown or Hamilton.” Students still have to graduate with a broad curriculum, but it’s an education they come up with for themselves. “That’s part of the reason people need to be willing to self-advocate and ask questions. What’s going to make them a consummate scholar and professional in that field?” They build their curriculum around their interests: they must take 3-course clusters in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences (their major requirements fulfill the cluster in 1 division).

UR acad bldg 1Partly stemming from the fact that students are interested in so many areas, it’s not surprising that Rochetser offers some unusual majors such as:

~UR statue5,100 undergraduates study on the main River Campus (500 students study at Eastman School of Music: see separate write-up), making this one of the smallest research schools in the country. Almost 20% of students are international, one of the highest among research institutions. There’s also a great deal of other diversity: 20% receiving Pell Grants, and “We’re a majority minority institution. When I started here, we were 80% white northeastern students. That’s not the case anymore.”

Admissions is test-flexible: students need to provide some evidence that they can hold their own in high-stakes testing: AP, IB, SAT/ACT, or Subject Tests. They can upload a link to a creative or research project for supplemental materials. Every application is double-read. When the readers disagree, the app goes to committee. Last year, almost 1/3 of applications were sent: “I’m not aiming for agreement,” said the VP of Enrollment. “The most interesting discussions come out of this disagreement. Students who received one of the Rochester awards as a HS Junior have their application fee waived.

~UR frat house

Greek housing

About 90% of students live on campus. Dorms are pre-wired for Cable and students get a pass for HBOgo. If students move off-campus, someone from the Office of Off-Campus Housing will help check places out and read over leases. Students are thrilled with the events on campus. “I was really overwhelmed with the number of extra-curriculars. It’s a ridiculous amount of stuff you can do.” Almost 25% of students go Greek. Sports are popular both to play and watch; they’re DIII except Squash (which can only compete at a DI level). There are several big activity weekends or events:

  • Meloria Weekend (Alumni Weekend).
  • Winter weekend: the school brings in huskies; gives away gloves, hats, or scarves; sets up bonfire and students roast smores, etc.
  • Boar’s Head Dinner is a Medieval-themed dinner (not unique to Rochester but rare enough!). A different professor tells the myth of the student and the Boar, putting their own theme on it. There’s singing, juggling, etc.

~UR shuttle mapWhen students want to get off campus, they can take one of the city buses that stop on campus and cost $1. The school buses are free.

For people worried about winters in Upstate NY, don’t worry too much: a great deal of campus is connected through tunnels. The academic buildings on the main quad are connected, as are several of the science buildings. Dorms are not connected due to security issues.

~UR chapel

Rochester’s non-denominational chapel

Students are happy with Rochester and were hard-pressed to find anything to change – a couple seemed almost offended that we’d even suggest that improvements needed to be made. A senior said, “Currently, I’d say food, but it’s because I’ve been eating it for 4 years. Maybe they could have a bit more international food??” A Junior said, “Parking was an issue, but they’ve built a new complex, revamped how people get parking passes, etc. We used to pay for laundry, now it’s free. They’ve added all-gender bathrooms. They have options to check off male, female, transgender, and other on the application.”

UR atriumThe school does seem to be responsive to needs and things that students want. They’ve added study spaces to keep up with the increased enrollment. There are even sleeping pods in the library; these were last year’s 5K Challenge winner: every year, students proposals ideas to improve campus. Winners are determined by student vote and are given $5,000 to implement the idea.

One of the students left us with this thought: “You’re bound to be successful here. If you want it, you’re going to get it.”

© 2015

St. John Fisher College

St. John Fisher College (visited 10/20/15)

~SJFC signFisher, nicknamed the College on the Hill, is a much newer university than I realized. They opened with 110 students in 1951to give an education to local Catholic boys, often from immigrant families. Now, they’re coed and have 2600 full-time undergrads and still hold the ideal of providing college access to generally underrepresented students. About 1/3 of their students are first-gen (their First-Gen scholarship provides support for up to 24 students) and 1/3 receive Pell Grants. 30-35 HEOP students enter each year with a 92% graduation rate.

~SJFC 9St. John Fisher was the Bishop of Rochester, England and the Chancellor at Cambridge. He was martyred when he was executed for refusing to accept King Henry VIII as the leader of the Church of England. SJFC broke away from the Catholic Church in the early ‘70s but retained their core beliefs – “Teach me discipline, wisdom, and knowledge” – but nothing is forced. Religious classes are offered but not required.

Mascot

Mascot

The student who ate breakfast with us said: “I’m pretty happy with the diversity. There’s a lot of religious diversity and I’ve seen a growth in the number of African-Americans since I’ve been here. I knew them all when I was a freshman, but I think the college saw that this was a problem and they’re working to recruit more people of color.”

~SJFC 8People are committed to the success of the students. People take care of each other and help each other out. In 2015, they received the Presidents Higher Education Community Service award for the 9th year in a row. The Service Scholars program provides 50% tuition scholarships; these students commit to 130 hours of service the first year and 200 hours every other year. We spoke to a student in this program; she’s currently doing Service Learning at the Galway Autism Program.

~SJFC labsFisher combines the Liberal Arts (college of A&S) with professional training (Education, Business, Nursing, and Pharmacy). Even the academic buildings are connected (except for 2): when the floor changes, you know you’re in another building. Students in the 2+4 Pharm program are assured an interview and are put into seminars for prep work. Media Studies provides training in new medias but also teaches older ones and how they inform the new. Nursing saves spots for the declared majors. Students who change majors and transfer students compete for the remaining spots. The Education Department is 1 of only 3 NYS schools with a teaching simulation lab.

~SJFC pharmacyThey’re clearly doing something right: the faculty get rave reviews from students (5 have received a Fulbright), and their alumni have met with a lot of success. Alumni include Ed Stack (Chairman and CEO of Dick’s Sporting Goods) and Martin Mucci (founder and CEO of Paychex). A junior we spoke to was surprised by the alumni connections. About 70% live within 100 miles so it’s easy to get in contact with them, shadow them, get internships, etc. The new President is committed to “creating a transformative educational experience for the students;” he particularly wants to grow the study abroad program (only 10% of students currently go abroad.

Sports fields with upperclassmen housing on the far side

Sports fields with upperclassmen housing on the far side

This is still very much a regional school (many students are from 100 miles) but they’re working on changing this. Only about 10% of their 550 freshmen commute, but only about 55% of all students live on campus. They do bring in a lot of transfer students who usually commute. Freshmen are not allowed to have cars on campus. They get free bus tokens for the RTS (city) buses which run through campus every hour; 1 token lasts all day. Campus shuttles run about every 5 minutes, and there are even shuttles to Wegmans (the iconic supermarket that has its roots nearby).

Art Studio

Art Studio

None of the students we spoke to ever had a class larger than 25; the smallest classes were almost all in the single-digits. Students had great things to say about the Honors Program: our tour guide is in this; she’s mentoring freshmen and doing research on mentoring in academia.

~SJFC 3Fisher provides freshmen with a core group of advisors who also teach the Freshmen Seminar classes. They meet with these advisors before they’re moved off to an academic advisor. Additionally, Learning Communities helped them adapt better and it enriched their experience right off the bat. One student said: “It taught me a lot about my interests. I took Americans Abroad, and we went to Quebec.” Another said, “It answered any and all questions. It’s really helpful.”

Sports are strong here both in terms of involvement on the teams and in drawing a fan base, particularly the football team (and the college has hosted the Buffalo Bills training camp). They have about 800 athletes, 80 of whom play for 2 or 3 seasons in one (or more) of the 23 DIII sports. Teams have made it to the quarterfinals twice in the last 3 years. Crew has tanks in the boathouse for year-round training. Athletes’ overall GPA is higher than the campus average, and retention tends to be 3-4% higher (86% vs about 82%).

Dining services get rave reviews and even won the “2014 Best of Rochester” in the Food Service Category. They have a Stir Fry station that our tour guide made a point of showing to us: “Where else can you have shrimp, steak, and lobster every day? Also, the dining staff knows you. The woman checking us in can tell when we’re not having a good day.”

A couple of students’ favorite traditions include:

  • Every other Thursday, a different food truck pulls up. The first 100 students eat for free! The Dining hall is good, but it’s nice to have the variety.
  • Courage Bowl, an annual event that benefits Camp Good Days and Special Times. They bring in campers to be honorary cheerleaders and coaches.

© 2015

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